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Food Chem. 2018 Jan 15;239:1117-1125. doi: 10.1016/j.foodchem.2017.07.055. Epub 2017 Jul 12.

Antioxidant activities of ginger extract and its constituents toward lipids.

Author information

1
Key Laboratory of Agricultural and Animal Products Processing and Quality Control, Ministry of Agriculture, Nanjing Agricultural University, Nanjing, China; Suzhou Polytechnic Institute of Agriculture, Suzhou, Jiangsu, China. Electronic address: swh8614@163.com.
2
Food and Nutritional Sciences Programme, School of Life Sciences, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, NT, Hong Kong, China. Electronic address: catherinechenyp@cuhk.edu.hk.
3
Key Laboratory of Agricultural and Animal Products Processing and Quality Control, Ministry of Agriculture, Nanjing Agricultural University, Nanjing, China. Electronic address: nau_zjh@njau.edu.cn.
4
Food and Nutritional Sciences Programme, School of Life Sciences, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, NT, Hong Kong, China. Electronic address: zhenyuchen@cuhk.edu.hk.
5
Food and Nutritional Sciences Programme, School of Life Sciences, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, NT, Hong Kong, China. Electronic address: anthonychung@cuhk.edu.hk.

Abstract

Lipid oxidation-a major cause of food product deterioration-necessitates the use of food additives to inhibit food oxidation. Ginger extract (GE) has been reported to possess antioxidant properties. However, components isolated from ginger have been rarely reported to inhibit fat oxidation. Herein, antioxidant properties of GE and four pure components derived from it (6-gingerol, 8-gingerol, 10-gingerol, and 6-shogaol) were examined and their properties were compared to those of butylated hydroxytoluene. GE and the constituent components exhibited antioxidant properties that might be attributed to their hydroxyl groups and suitable solubilizing side chains. 6-Shogaol and 10-gingerol exhibited higher activity at 60°C than 6-gingerol and 8-gingerol. Low antioxidant activity was detected at high temperatures (120/180°C). Overall, GE displayed the strongest dose-dependent antioxidant properties, especially at high temperatures, thereby demonstrating that GE can be employed as a natural antioxidant in lipid-containing processed foods.

KEYWORDS:

10-Gingerol (PubChem CID: 168115); 6-Gingerol (PubChem CID: 442793); 6-Shogaol (PubChem CID: 5281794); 8-Gingerol (PubChem CID: 168114); Antioxidant properties; Fatty acids; Ginger extract; Preservatives

PMID:
28873530
DOI:
10.1016/j.foodchem.2017.07.055
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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