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Ethn Health. 2017 Sep 4:1-12. doi: 10.1080/13557858.2017.1373073. [Epub ahead of print]

Racial/ethnic variation in the prevalence of vaccine-related human papillomavirus genotypes.

Author information

1
a Department of Pediatrics , Baylor College of Medicine , Houston , TX , USA.
2
b Dan L. Duncan Cancer Center , Baylor College of Medicine , Houston , TX , USA.
3
c Department of Pediatrics , Tulane University School of Medicine , New Orleans , LA , USA.
4
d Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology , Texas Tech Health Sciences Center , El Paso , TX , USA.
5
e Department of Diagnostic and Biomedical Sciences , University of Texas School of Dentistry , Houston , TX , USA.
6
f Department of Integrative Oncology , British Columbia Cancer Research Centre , Vancouver , BC , Canada.
7
g Department of Otolaryngology , Baylor College of Medicine , Houston , TX , USA.
8
h Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology , Brookdale University Hospital and Medical Center , Brooklyn , NY , USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

There are currently three licensed human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines that protect against cervical cancer. Here we compare the prevalence of bi-, quadri-, and nonavalent vaccine-related HPV genotypes in a multi-ethnic sample of non-Hispanic white, non-Hispanic black, Hispanic, and Asian women.

DESIGN:

Patients in this analysis (n = 419) represent a subset of women with a previous abnormal Pap test participating in a clinical trial. HPV genotyping was conducted using the Roche Linear Array. Prevalent HPV genotypes were grouped according to their inclusion in each of the vaccines: bivalent (16, 18), quadrivalent (16, 18, 6, 11), and nonavalent (16, 18, 31, 33, 45, 52, 58, 6, 11).

RESULTS:

The prevalence of HPV genotypes covered by the bi-/quadrivalent vaccines was lowest among non-Hispanic black (15%) and Hispanic women (20%), compared to non-Hispanic white (38%) and Asian women (38%). Across all racial/ethnic groups, a large proportion of infections (38%-49%) were with genotypes included in the nonavalent vaccine. However, the prevalence of HPV genotypes not covered by any vaccine was significantly higher among non-Hispanic black (36%) and Hispanic women (42%), compared to non-Hispanic white (24%) and Asian women (16%) (p < 0.001). Racial/ethnic differences in HPV genotype prevalence were observed when controlling for demographic and sexual behavior characteristics, as well as when restricting the analysis to women with CIN 2+.

CONCLUSION:

Our data suggest racial/ethnic differences in the prevalence of vaccine-related HPV genotypes. In particular, non-Hispanic black and Hispanic women had the lowest prevalence of HPV genotypes covered by the bi-/quadrivalent vaccines. While a large proportion of their infections were covered by the nonavalent vaccine, non-Hispanic black and Hispanic women also had the highest prevalence of HPV genotypes not covered by any vaccine.

KEYWORDS:

Human papillomavirus; cervical neoplasia; race/ethnicity; vaccine

PMID:
28870103
PMCID:
PMC6185800
[Available on 2019-03-04]
DOI:
10.1080/13557858.2017.1373073

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