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Nat Med. 2017 Oct;23(10):1146-1149. doi: 10.1038/nm.4396. Epub 2017 Sep 4.

Human-monoclonal-antibody therapy protects nonhuman primates against advanced Lassa fever.

Author information

1
Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston, Galveston, Texas, USA.
2
Galveston National Laboratory, University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston, Galveston, Texas, USA.
3
Zalgen Labs, Germantown, Maryland, USA.
4
Viral Hemorrhagic Fever Program, Kenema Government Hospital, Kenema, Sierra Leone.
5
Ministry of Health and Sanitation, Freetown, Sierra Leone.
6
Polytechnic College, Kenema, Sierra Leone.
7
Sections of Infectious Disease, Departments of Pediatrics and Internal Medicine, School of Medicine, Tulane University, New Orleans, Louisiana, USA.
8
Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Tulane University, New Orleans, Louisiana, USA.
9
Tulane Center of Excellence, Global Viral Network, Tulane University, New Orleans, Louisiana, USA.

Abstract

There are no approved treatments for Lassa fever, which is endemic to the same regions of West Africa that were recently devastated by Ebola. Here we show that a combination of human monoclonal antibodies that cross-react with the glycoproteins of all four clades of Lassa virus is able to rescue 100% of cynomolgus macaques when treatment is initiated at advanced stages of disease, including up to 8 d after challenge.

PMID:
28869611
PMCID:
PMC5719877
DOI:
10.1038/nm.4396
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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