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Pediatr Pulmonol. 2017 Oct;52(10):1363-1370. doi: 10.1002/ppul.23795. Epub 2017 Sep 4.

The role of respiratory tract infections and the microbiome in the development of asthma: A narrative review.

Author information

1
The Generation R Study Group, Erasmus MC, University Medical Centre Rotterdam, Rotterdam, The Netherlands.
2
Department of Pediatrics, Division of Respiratory Medicine and Allergology, Erasmus MC, University Medical Centre Rotterdam, Rotterdam, The Netherlands.
3
Department of Epidemiology, Erasmus MC, University Medical Centre Rotterdam, Rotterdam, The Netherlands.
4
Department of Pediatrics, Erasmus MC, University Medical Centre Rotterdam, Rotterdam, The Netherlands.
5
COPSAC (Copenhagen Prospective Studies on Asthma in Childhood), Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
6
Danish Pediatric Asthma Center, Gentofte Hospital, The Capital Region, Copenhagen, Denmark.
7
Department of Pediatrics, Division of Neonatology, Erasmus MC, University Medical Centre Rotterdam, Rotterdam, The Netherlands.

Abstract

Asthma is a common disease in childhood, and might predispose for chronic obstructive respiratory morbidity in adolescence and adulthood. Various early-life risk factors might influence the risk of wheezing, asthma, and lower lung function in childhood. Cohort studies demonstrated that lower respiratory tract infections in the first years of life are associated with an increased risk of wheezing and asthma, while the association with lung function is less clear. Additionally, the gut and airway microbiome might influence the risk of wheezing and asthma. The interaction between respiratory tract infections and the microbiome complicates studies of their associations with wheezing, asthma, and lung function. Furthermore, the causality behind these observations is still unclear, and several other factors such as genetic susceptibility and the immune system might be of importance. This review is focused on the association of early-life respiratory tract infections and the microbiome with wheezing, asthma, and lung function, it is possible influencing factors and perspectives for future studies.

KEYWORDS:

asthma; children; epidemiology; microbiome; respiratory tract infections; wheeze

PMID:
28869358
DOI:
10.1002/ppul.23795
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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