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Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2017 Sep;26(9):1466-1469. doi: 10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-17-0148.

Genetic Ancestry Is not Associated with Breast Cancer Recurrence or Survival in U.S. Latina Women Enrolled in the Kaiser Permanente Pathways Study.

Author information

1
Department of Epidemiology & Biostatistics, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California.
2
Division of Research, Kaiser Permanente Northern California, Oakland, California.
3
Department of Cancer Prevention and Control, Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, New York.
4
Department of Medicine, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California. laura.fejerman@ucsf.edu.

Abstract

Background: The U.S. Hispanic/Latino population is heterogeneous both socioculturally and by the proportion of European, Indigenous American, and African ancestry of the regions from which individuals originate. A previous study reported that genetic ancestry was associated with breast cancer survival among Latinas, independent of sociodemographic and tumor characteristics, suggesting that a genetic factor associated with ancestry may affect breast cancer survival.Methods: We evaluated the association of genetic ancestry with breast cancer outcomes among 506 Latina women with invasive breast cancer in the Pathways Study, a cohort study within Kaiser Permanente, an integrated health care delivery system. Proportional hazards models were used to assess the effect of ancestry on breast cancer recurrence (53 events), breast cancer-specific mortality (31 events) and all-cause mortality (54 events), with a mean follow-up time of 6 years.Results: Indigenous American ancestry was not associated with breast cancer recurrence [HR = 1.00 per 10% increase; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.86-1.16], breast cancer mortality (HR = 0.95; 95% CI, 0.77-1.17), or all-cause mortality (HR = 0.93; 95% CI, 0.80-1.08). Adjustment for sociodemographic variables, tumor characteristics, and treatment did not alter the associations.Conclusions: Our results suggest that previously reported differences in breast cancer survival by genetic ancestry may be overcome by improving health care access and/or quality.Impact: Improving health care access and quality may reduce breast cancer disparities among U.S. Latinas. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 26(9); 1466-9. ©2017 AACR.

PMID:
28864455
PMCID:
PMC5657515
DOI:
10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-17-0148
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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