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Obes Surg. 2018 Jan;28(1):234-241. doi: 10.1007/s11695-017-2841-0.

Treatment of Vitamin and Mineral Deficiencies After Biliopancreatic Diversion With or Without Duodenal Switch: a Major Challenge.

Author information

1
Department of Surgery, Rijnstate Hospital, Postal number 1190, 6800TA, Arnhem, The Netherlands. jhoman@rijnstate.nl.
2
Department of Surgery, Rijnstate Hospital, Postal number 1190, 6800TA, Arnhem, The Netherlands.
3
Department of Internal Medicine, Rijnstate Hospital, Arnhem, The Netherlands.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Vitamin and mineral deficiencies are a major concern after biliopancreatic diversion (BPD) and BPD with duodenal switch (BPD/DS). Evidence-based guidelines how to prevent or how to treat deficiencies in these patients are currently lacking. The aim of the current study is to give an overview of postsurgical deficiencies and how to prevent and treat these deficiencies.

METHODS:

Retrospective evaluation of a 1-year structured monitoring and treatment schedule for various deficiencies in 34 patients after BPD or BPD/DS.

RESULTS:

Patients were introduced into the program 12-90 months after surgery. Vitamin B1, B6, B9, and B12 deficiencies could be prevented by mean daily doses of 2.75 mg, 980 μg, 600 μg, and 350 μg, respectively. However, many patients continued to develop deficiencies of vitamin A, D, iron, calcium, and zinc despite major dose adjustments. Current observations suggest that at least total daily doses of 200 mg Fe in premenopausal women and 100 mg in men, 100 mg of Zinc, 3000 mg of calcium, and weekly doses of at least 50,000 IU solubilized vitamin A and vitamin D are needed to prevent the occurrence of major deficiencies.

CONCLUSION:

Exceptionally high supplementation doses are needed to prevent and treat vitamin and mineral deficiencies in patients after BPD or BPD/DS. Further refinement and simplification of treatment schedules is needed. Focus on improvement of compliance to treatment is recommended.

KEYWORDS:

BPD; BPD/DS; Treatments; Vitamin and mineral deficiencies

PMID:
28861696
DOI:
10.1007/s11695-017-2841-0
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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