Format

Send to

Choose Destination
J Insect Physiol. 2018 Apr;106(Pt 1):20-29. doi: 10.1016/j.jinsphys.2017.08.011. Epub 2017 Aug 30.

The adult foraging assay (AFA) detects strain and food-deprivation effects in feeding-related traits of Drosophila melanogaster.

Author information

1
Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Toronto, 25 Willcocks Street, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3B2, Canada.
2
Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Toronto, 25 Willcocks Street, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3B2, Canada; Child and Brain Development Program, Canadian Institute for Advanced Research (CIFAR), 180 Dundas St. West, Suite 1400, Toronto, Ontario M5G 1Z8, Canada.
3
Program in Integrative Biology and Neuroscience, Florida Atlantic University, Jupiter, FL 33458, USA; Department of Neuroscience, The Scripps Research Institute, 130 Scripps Way 3B3, Jupiter, FL 33458, USA; Center on Aging, The Scripps Research Institute, 130 Scripps Way 3B3, Jupiter, FL 33458, USA.
4
Department of Neuroscience, The Scripps Research Institute, 130 Scripps Way 3B3, Jupiter, FL 33458, USA; Center on Aging, The Scripps Research Institute, 130 Scripps Way 3B3, Jupiter, FL 33458, USA.
5
JP Scott Center for Neuroscience, Mind & Behavior, Biological Sciences, Bowling Green State University, Bowling Green, OH 43614, USA; Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, Harvard University, 10 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA.
6
Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Toronto, 25 Willcocks Street, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3B2, Canada; Child and Brain Development Program, Canadian Institute for Advanced Research (CIFAR), 180 Dundas St. West, Suite 1400, Toronto, Ontario M5G 1Z8, Canada. Electronic address: marla.sokolowski@utoronto.ca.

Abstract

We introduce a high-resolution adult foraging assay (AFA) that relates pre- and post-ingestive walking behavior to individual instances of food consumption. We explore the utility of the AFA by taking advantage of established rover and sitter strains known to differ in a number of feeding-related traits. The AFA allows us to effectively distinguish locomotor behavior in Fed and Food-Deprived (FD) rover and sitter foragers. We found that rovers exhibit more exploratory behavior into the center of an arena containing sucrose drops compared to sitters who hug the edges of the arena and exhibit thigmotaxic behavior. Rovers also discover and ingest more sucrose drops than sitters. Sitters become more exploratory with increasing durations of food deprivation and the number of ingestion events also increases progressively with prolonged fasting for both strains. AFA results are matched by strain differences in sucrose responsiveness, starvation resistance, and lipid levels, suggesting that under the same feeding condition, rovers are more motivated to forage than sitters. These findings demonstrate the AFA's ability to effectively discriminate movement and food ingestion patterns of different strains and feeding treatments.

KEYWORDS:

Adult foraging assay; Drosophila melanogaster; Food deprivation; Food search; Ingestion; Thigmotaxis

PMID:
28860037
PMCID:
PMC5832525
[Available on 2019-04-01]
DOI:
10.1016/j.jinsphys.2017.08.011

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center