Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Nurs Res. 2017 Sep/Oct;66(5):410-416. doi: 10.1097/NNR.0000000000000239.

Effort-Reward Imbalance and Burnout Among ICU Nursing Staff: A Cross-Sectional Study.

Author information

1
Cristobal Padilla Fortunatti, RN, is Staff Nurse, Red de Salud UC-CHRISTUS, Santiago, Chile; and is a Master's candidate at Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile. Yasna K. Palmeiro-Silva, MPH, RN, is Assistant Professor, School of Nursing, Universidad de los Andes, and CEO, Data&Health, Santiago, Chile.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Occupational stress is commonly observed among staff in intensive care units (ICUs). Sociodemographic, organizational, and job-related factors may lead to burnout among ICU health workers. In addition, these factors could modify the balance between efforts done and rewards perceived by workers; consequently, this imbalance could increase levels of emotional exhaustion and depersonalization and decrease a sense of personal accomplishment.

OBJECTIVE:

The purpose of this study was to analyze the relationship between effort-reward imbalance and burnout dimensions (emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, and personal accomplishment) among ICU nursing staff in a university hospital in Santiago, Chile.

METHODS:

A convenience sample of 36 registered nurses and 46 nurse aides answered the Maslach Burnout Inventory and Effort-Reward Imbalance Questionnaire and provided sociodemographic and work-related data.

RESULTS:

Age and effort-reward imbalance were significantly associated with emotional exhaustion in both registered nurses and nurse aides; age was negatively correlated with emotional exhaustion, whereas effort-reward imbalance was positively correlated. Age was negatively associated with depersonalization. None of the predictors were associated with personal accomplishment.

DISCUSSION:

This study adds valuable information about relationships of sociodemographic factors and effort-reward imbalance and their impact on dimensions of burnout, particularly on emotional exhaustion.

PMID:
28858150
DOI:
10.1097/NNR.0000000000000239
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Wolters Kluwer
Loading ...
Support Center