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Sci Rep. 2017 Aug 30;7(1):9996. doi: 10.1038/s41598-017-10088-5.

Developmentally Regulated GTP binding protein 1 (DRG1) controls microtubule dynamics.

Author information

1
Friedrich Miescher Laboratory of the Max Planck Society, Spemannstraße 39, 72076, Tübingen, Germany.
2
Institute of Biochemistry and Molecular Cell Biology, Medical School, RWTH Aachen University, 52074, Aachen, Germany.
3
Cellular Nanoscience, Center for Plant Molecular Biology (ZMBP), University of Tübingen, 72076, Tübingen, Germany.
4
Max Planck Institute for Developmental Biology, Spemannstraße 35, 72076, Tübingen, Germany.
5
Friedrich Miescher Laboratory of the Max Planck Society, Spemannstraße 39, 72076, Tübingen, Germany. wantonin@ukaachen.de.
6
Institute of Biochemistry and Molecular Cell Biology, Medical School, RWTH Aachen University, 52074, Aachen, Germany. wantonin@ukaachen.de.

Abstract

The mitotic spindle, essential for segregating the sister chromatids into the two evolving daughter cells, is composed of highly dynamic cytoskeletal filaments, the microtubules. The dynamics of microtubules are regulated by numerous microtubule associated proteins. We identify here Developmentally regulated GTP binding protein 1 (DRG1) as a microtubule binding protein with diverse microtubule-associated functions. In vitro, DRG1 can diffuse on microtubules, promote their polymerization, drive microtubule formation into bundles, and stabilize microtubules. HeLa cells with reduced DRG1 levels show delayed progression from prophase to anaphase because spindle formation is slowed down. To perform its microtubule-associated functions, DRG1, although being a GTPase, does not require GTP hydrolysis. However, all domains are required as truncated versions show none of the mentioned activities besides microtubule binding.

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