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Chemosphere. 2017 Nov;187:268-276. doi: 10.1016/j.chemosphere.2017.08.085. Epub 2017 Aug 19.

Degradation of acrylamide by the UV/chlorine advanced oxidation process.

Author information

1
State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, Institute of Disinfection By-product Control in Water Treatment, College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tongji University, Shanghai 200092, PR China.
2
Department of Safety, Health and Environmental Engineering, National Kaohsiung First University of Science and Technology, Kaohsiung 824, Taiwan, ROC.
3
State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, Institute of Disinfection By-product Control in Water Treatment, College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tongji University, Shanghai 200092, PR China. Electronic address: tjwenwu@tongji.edu.cn.
4
State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, School of the Environment, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210023, PR China.

Abstract

The degradation of acrylamide (AA) during UV/chlorine advanced oxidation process (AOP) was investigated in this study. The degradation of AA was negligible during UV irradiation alone. However, AA could be effectively degraded and mineralized during UV/chlorination due to the generation of hydroxyl radicals (OH). The degradation kinetics of AA during UV/chlorination fitted the pseudo-first order kinetics with the rate constant between AA and OH radicals being determined as 2.11 × 109 M-1 s-1. The degradation rate and mineralization of AA during UV/chlorination were significantly promoted at acidic conditions as well as increasing chlorine dosage. The volatile degradation products of AA during UV/chlorination were identified using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and the degradation pathways were then proposed accordingly. The formation of disinfection by-products (DBPs) in Milli-Q water and tap water during UV/chlorination of AA was also investigated. The DBPs included chloroform, dichloroacetonitrile, trichloroacetonitrile, 2,2-dichloroacetamide and 2,2,2-trichloroacetamide. Furthermore, the variations of AA degradation during UV/chlorination in different real water samples were evaluated.

KEYWORDS:

Acrylamide; Flocculants; Hydroxyl radicals; UV/chlorination; Water treatment

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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