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Eur Arch Otorhinolaryngol. 2017 Nov;274(11):3933-3940. doi: 10.1007/s00405-017-4719-0. Epub 2017 Aug 29.

Association of breathing sound spectra with glottal dimensions in exercise-induced vocal cord dysfunction.

Author information

1
Department of Otorhinolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, University of Helsinki and Helsinki University Hospital, PL 220, 00029, Helsinki, Finland. ahmed.geneid@hus.fi.
2
Department of Otorhinolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, University of Helsinki and Helsinki University Hospital, PL 220, 00029, Helsinki, Finland.
3
Department of Clinical Physiology, HUS Medical Imaging Center, University of Helsinki and Helsinki University Hospital, Helsinki, Finland.

Abstract

The objective of this study was to evaluate associations between the breathing sound spectra and glottal dimensions in exercise-induced vocal cord dysfunction (EIVCD) during a bicycle ergometry test. Nineteen subjects (mean age 21.8 years and range 13-39 years) with suspected EIVCD were studied. Vocal folds were continuously imaged with videolaryngoscopy and breathing sounds were recorded during the bicycle exercise test. Twelve subjects showed paradoxical movement of the vocal folds during inspiration by the end of the exercise. In seven subjects, no abnormal reactions in vocal folds were found; they served as control subjects. The glottal quotient (interarytenoid distance divided by the anteroposterior glottal distance) was calculated. From the same time period, the tracheal-vocal tract resonance peaks of the breathing sound spectra were analyzed, and stridor sounds were detected and measured. Subjects with EIVCD showed significantly higher resonance peaks during the inspiratory phase compared to the expiratory phase (p < 0.014). The glottal quotient decreased significantly in the EIVCD group (p < 0.001), but not in the control group. 8 out of 12 EIVCD patients (67%) showed stridor sounds, while none of the controls did. There was a significant inverse correlation between the frequencies of the breathing sound resonance peaks and the glottal quotient. The findings indicate that the typical EIVCD reaction of a paradoxical approximation of the vocal folds during inspiration, measured here as a decrease in the glottal quotient, is significantly associated with an increase in inspiratory resonance peaks. The findings are applicable in the documentation of EIVCD findings using videolaryngoscopy, in addition to giving clinicians tools for EIVCD recognition. However, the study is limited by the small number of subjects.

KEYWORDS:

Glottal quotient; Paradoxical vocal cord movement; Stridor; VCD; Videolaryngoscopy; Vocal cord dysfunction

PMID:
28852841
PMCID:
PMC5633624
DOI:
10.1007/s00405-017-4719-0
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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