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Int J Audiol. 2017 Dec;56(12):976-988. doi: 10.1080/14992027.2017.1358467. Epub 2017 Aug 29.

Preliminary evaluation of a novel non-linear frequency compression scheme for use in children.

Author information

1
a Hearts for Hearing , Oklahoma City , OK , USA.
2
b Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences , University of North Texas , Denton , TX , USA.
3
c Sonova AG, Science and Technology Department , Stafa , Switzerland.
4
d Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders , University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center , Oklahoma City , OK , USA and.
5
e Phonak LLC , Warrenville , IL , USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

The primary goal of this study was to evaluate a new form of non-linear frequency compression (NLFC) in children. The new NLFC processing scheme is adaptive and potentially allows for a better preservation of the spectral characteristics of the input sounds when compared to conventional NLFC processing.

DESIGN:

A repeated-measures design was utilised to compare the speech perception of the participants with two configurations of the new adaptive NLFC processing to their performance with the existing NLFC. The outcome measures included the University of Western Ontario Plurals test, the Consonant-Nucleus-Consonant word recognition test, and the Phonak Phoneme Perception test.

STUDY SAMPLE:

Study participants included 14 children, aged 6-17 years, with mild-to-severe low-frequency hearing loss and severe-to-profound high-frequency hearing loss.

RESULTS:

The results indicated that the use of the new adaptive NLFC processing resulted in significantly better average word recognition and plural detection relative to the conventional NLFC processing.

CONCLUSION:

Overall, the adaptive NLFC processing evaluated in this study has the potential to significantly improve speech perception relative to conventional NLFC processing.

KEYWORDS:

Hearing aids; behavioural measures; paediatric; speech perception

PMID:
28851244
DOI:
10.1080/14992027.2017.1358467
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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