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J Dermatolog Treat. 2018 Jun;29(4):324-328. doi: 10.1080/09546634.2017.1373735. Epub 2017 Sep 19.

A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of the effect of monthly vitamin D supplementation in mild psoriasis.

Author information

1
a Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics , The University of Auckland , Auckland , New Zealand.
2
b Department of Medicine , The University of Auckland , Auckland , New Zealand.
3
c Department of Dermatology , Middlemore Hospital , Auckland , New Zealand.
4
d Department of Emergency Medicine and Division of Rheumatology, Allergy, and Immunology , Department of Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School , Boston , MA , USA.
5
e Ko Awatea , Centre for Research, Knowledge and Information Management , Auckland , New Zealand.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

To investigate the clinical effect of vitamin D3 supplementation on psoriasis from a community-dwelling population.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

Participants with psoriasis in a large randomized controlled trial examining the effect of vitamin D3 supplementation (100,000 IU monthly) in adults aged 50-84 years were invited to participate in a psoriasis sub-study over 12 months. The primary outcome was the Psoriasis Area and Severity Index (PASI) and secondary outcomes were Physicians Global Assessment (PGA), Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI), and Psoriasis Disability Index (PDI). Trial identification number ACTRN12611000402943.

RESULTS:

Twenty-three were allocated to vitamin D and 42 to placebo. There was no significant difference at baseline between the two groups. Mean (SD) baseline 25-hydroxyvitamin D was 65.7 (25.7) nmol/L. There were no significant differences (p > .05) between the groups in all of the psoriasis outcome measures. Mean scores [95% CI] at 12 months for the Placebo versus Vitamin D groups: PASI 2.2 [1.4, 3.0] versus 2.1 [1.0, 3.2]; PGA 1.4 [1.1, 1.7] versus 1.5 [1.1, 1.9]; PDI 2.1 [0.9, 3.2] versus 1.9 [0.4, 3.4]; and DLQI 2.5 [1.4, 3.6] versus 2.0 [0.5, 3.4].

CONCLUSION:

Vitamin D3 supplementation (100,000 IU per month) is not recommended as a treatment for mild psoriasis.

KEYWORDS:

Vitamin D; double-blind; mild; placebo-controlled; psoriasis; randomized

PMID:
28849682
DOI:
10.1080/09546634.2017.1373735
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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