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J Gen Intern Med. 2017 Aug 28. doi: 10.1007/s11606-017-4169-9. [Epub ahead of print]

Integration of Primary Care and Psychiatry: A New Paradigm for Medical Student Clerkships.

Author information

1
Department of Psychiatry, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, USA. kirsten.wilkins@yale.edu.
2
Department of Pediatrics, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, USA.
3
Department of Psychiatry, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, USA.
4
Department of Medicine, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Public health crises in primary care and psychiatry have prompted development of innovative, integrated care models, yet undergraduate medical education is not currently designed to prepare future physicians to work within such systems.

AIM:

To implement an integrated primary care-psychiatry clerkship for third-year medical students.

SETTING:

Undergraduate medical education, amid institutional curriculum reform.

PARTICIPANTS:

Two hundred thirty-seven medical students participated in the clerkship in academic years 2015-2017.

PROGRAM DESCRIPTION:

Educators in psychiatry, internal medicine, and pediatrics developed a 12-week integrated Biopsychosocial Approach to Health (BAH)/Primary Care-Psychiatry Clerkship. The clerkship provides students clinical experience in primary care, psychiatry, and integrated care settings, and a longitudinal, integrated didactic series covering key areas of interface between the two disciplines.

PROGRAM EVALUATION:

Students reported satisfaction with the clerkship overall, rating it 3.9-4.3 on a 1-5 Likert scale, but many found its clinical curriculum and administrative organization disorienting. Students appreciated the conceptual rationale integrating primary care and psychiatry more in the classroom setting than in the clinical setting.

CONCLUSIONS:

While preliminary clerkship outcomes are promising, further optimization and evaluation of clinical and classroom curricula are ongoing. This novel educational paradigm is one model for preparing students for the integrated healthcare system of the twenty-first century.

KEYWORDS:

medical education: curriculum development/evaluation; medical student and residency education; mental health; primary care

PMID:
28849354
DOI:
10.1007/s11606-017-4169-9
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