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Gastroenterology. 2017 Dec;153(6):1634-1646.e8. doi: 10.1053/j.gastro.2017.08.037. Epub 2017 Aug 25.

A Panel of Methylated MicroRNA Biomarkers for Identifying High-Risk Patients With Ulcerative Colitis-Associated Colorectal Cancer.

Author information

1
Center for Gastrointestinal Research, Center for Translational Genomics and Oncology, Baylor Scott & White Research Institute and Charles A. Sammons Cancer Center, Baylor Research Institute and Sammons Cancer Center, Baylor University Medical Center, Dallas, Texas; Department of Gastrointestinal and Pediatric Surgery, Division of Reparative Medicine, Institute of Life Sciences, Graduate School of Medicine, Mie University, Mie, Japan.
2
Department of Gastrointestinal and Pediatric Surgery, Division of Reparative Medicine, Institute of Life Sciences, Graduate School of Medicine, Mie University, Mie, Japan.
3
Department of Preventive Medicine, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya, Japan.
4
Department of Inflammatory Bowel Disease, Hyogo College of Medicine, Hyogo, Japan.
5
Department of Surgical Pathology, Hyogo College of Medicine, Hyogo, Japan.
6
Center for Gastrointestinal Research, Center for Translational Genomics and Oncology, Baylor Scott & White Research Institute and Charles A. Sammons Cancer Center, Baylor Research Institute and Sammons Cancer Center, Baylor University Medical Center, Dallas, Texas; School of Medicine, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California.
7
Center for Gastrointestinal Research, Center for Translational Genomics and Oncology, Baylor Scott & White Research Institute and Charles A. Sammons Cancer Center, Baylor Research Institute and Sammons Cancer Center, Baylor University Medical Center, Dallas, Texas. Electronic address: Ajay.Goel@BSWHealth.org.

Abstract

BACKGROUND & AIMS:

Methylation of specific microRNAs (miRNAs) often occurs in an age-dependent manner, as a field defect in some instances, and may be an early event in colitis-associated carcinogenesis. We aimed to determine whether specific mRNA signature patterns (MIR1, MIR9, MIR124, MIR137, MIR34B/C) could be used to identify patients with ulcerative colitis (UC) who are at increased risk for colorectal neoplasia.

METHODS:

We obtained 387 colorectal tissue specimens collected from 238 patients with UC (152 without neoplasia, 17 with dysplasia, and 69 with UC-associated colorectal cancer [UC-CRC]), from 2 independent cohorts in Japan between 2005 and 2015. We quantified methylation of miRNAs by bisulfite pyrosequencing analysis. We analyzed clinical data to determine whether miRNA methylation patterns were associated with age, location, or segment of the colorectum (cecum, transverse colon, and rectum). Differences in tissue miRNA methylation and expression levels were compared among samples and associated with cancer risk using the Wilcoxon, Mann-Whitney, and Kruskal-Wallis tests as appropriate. We performed a validation study of samples from 90 patients without UC and 61 patients with UC-associated dysplasia or cancer to confirm the association between specific methylation patterns of miRNAs in non-tumor rectal mucosa from patients with UC at risk of UC-CRC.

RESULTS:

Among patients with UC without neoplasia, rectal tissues had significantly higher levels of methylation levels of MIR1, MIR9, MIR124, and MIR137 than in proximal mucosa; levels of methylation were associated with age and duration of UC in rectal mucosa. Methylation of all miRNAs was significantly higher in samples from patients with dysplasia or CRC compared with samples from patients without neoplasia. Receiver operating characteristic analysis revealed that methylation levels of miRNAs in rectal mucosa accurately differentiated patients with CRC from those without. Methylation of MIR137 in rectal mucosa was an independent risk factor for UC-CRC. Methylation patterns of a set of miRNAs (panel) could discriminate discriminate UC patients with or without dysplasia or CRC in the evaluation cohort (area under the curve, 0.81) and the validation cohort (area under the curve, 0.78).

CONCLUSIONS:

In evaluation and validation cohorts, we found specific miRNAs to be methylated in rectal mucosal samples from patients with UC with dysplasia or CRC compared with patients without neoplasms. This pattern also associated with patient age and might be used to identify patients with UC at greatest risk for developing UC-CRC. Our findings provide evidence for a field defect in rectal mucosa from patients with UC-CRC.

KEYWORDS:

Colitis-Associated Cancer; MIR1; MIR124; MIR137; MIR34B/C; MIR9; Methylation; Ulcerative Colitis

PMID:
28847750
PMCID:
PMC5748293
DOI:
10.1053/j.gastro.2017.08.037
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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