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Lancet Diabetes Endocrinol. 2018 Jan;6(1):69-80. doi: 10.1016/S2213-8587(17)30186-9. Epub 2017 Aug 25.

Type 2 diabetes in adolescents and young adults.

Author information

1
School of Life and Health Sciences, Aston University, Birmingham, UK.
2
Aston Research Centre for Healthy Ageing (ARCHA), Aston University, Birmingham, UK.
3
Diabetes and Endocrine Centre, Heart of England NHS Foundation Trust, Birmingham, UK; University of Birmingham, Birmingham, UK.
4
Aston Research Centre for Healthy Ageing (ARCHA), Aston University, Birmingham, UK. Electronic address: s.bellary@aston.ac.uk.

Abstract

The prevalence of type 2 diabetes in adolescents and young adults is dramatically increasing. Similar to older-onset type 2 diabetes, the major predisposing risk factors are obesity, family history, and sedentary lifestyle. Onset of diabetes at a younger age (defined here as up to age 40 years) is associated with longer disease exposure and increased risk for chronic complications. Young-onset type 2 diabetes also affects more individuals of working age, accentuating the adverse societal effects of the disease. Furthermore, evidence is accumulating that young-onset type 2 diabetes has a more aggressive disease phenotype, leading to premature development of complications, with adverse effects on quality of life and unfavourable effects on long-term outcomes, raising the possibility of a future public health catastrophe. In this Review, we describe the epidemiology and existing knowledge regarding pathophysiology, risk factors, complications, and management of type 2 diabetes in adolescents and young adults.

PMID:
28847479
DOI:
10.1016/S2213-8587(17)30186-9
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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