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Rev Neurol (Paris). 2017 Jul - Aug;173(7-8):461-472. doi: 10.1016/j.neurol.2017.07.006. Epub 2017 Aug 26.

Neuropsychology of traumatic brain injury: An expert overview.

Author information

1
Service de médecine physique et de réadaptation, hôpital Raymond-Poincaré, AP-HP, 104, boulevard Raymond-Poincaré, 92380 Garches, France; HANDIReSP EA 4047, université de Versailles Saint-Quentin, 78423 Montigny-Le-Bretonneux, France. Electronic address: Philippe.azouvi@aphp.fr.
2
Service de médecine physique et de réadaptation, hôpital Raymond-Poincaré, AP-HP, 104, boulevard Raymond-Poincaré, 92380 Garches, France; HANDIReSP EA 4047, université de Versailles Saint-Quentin, 78423 Montigny-Le-Bretonneux, France.
3
HANDIReSP EA 4047, université de Versailles Saint-Quentin, 78423 Montigny-Le-Bretonneux, France; Laboratoire de psychopathologie et neuropsychologie, EA 2027, université Paris-8-Saint-Denis, 2, rue de la Liberté, 93526 Saint-Denis, France; Antenne UEROS- UGECAMIDF, hôpital Raymond-Poincaré, 104, boulevard Raymond-Poincaré, 92380 Garches, France.

Abstract

Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a serious healthcare problem, and this report is a selective review of recent findings on the epidemiology, pathophysiology and neuropsychological impairments following TBI. Patients who survive moderate-to-severe TBI frequently suffer from a wide range of cognitive deficits and behavioral changes due to diffuse axonal injury. These deficits include slowed information-processing and impaired long-term memory, attention, working memory, executive function, social cognition and self-awareness. Mental fatigue is frequently also associated and can exacerbate the consequences of neuropsychological deficits. Personality and behavioral changes can include combinations of impulsivity and apathy. Even mild TBI raises specific problems: while most patients recover within a few weeks or months, a minority of patients may suffer from long-lasting symptoms (post-concussion syndrome). The pathophysiology of such persistent problems remains a subject of debate, but seems to be due to both injury-related and non-injury-related factors.

KEYWORDS:

Executive function; Memory; Traumatic brain injury: Cognition

PMID:
28847474
DOI:
10.1016/j.neurol.2017.07.006
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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