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Nat Methods. 2017 Oct;14(10):959-962. doi: 10.1038/nmeth.4396. Epub 2017 Aug 28.

An improved ATAC-seq protocol reduces background and enables interrogation of frozen tissues.

Author information

1
Center for Personal Dynamic Regulomes, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California, USA.
2
Department of Dermatology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California, USA.
3
Department of Genetics, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California, USA.
4
Department of Bioengineering, Stanford University School of Medicine and School of Engineering, Stanford, California, USA.
5
Program in Cancer Biology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California, USA.
6
Program in Biomedical Informatics, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California, USA.
7
Department of Pathology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California, USA.
8
Department of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California, USA.
9
Department of Computer Science, Stanford University, Stanford, California, USA.
10
Chan Zuckerberg Biohub, San Francisco, California, USA.

Abstract

We present Omni-ATAC, an improved ATAC-seq protocol for chromatin accessibility profiling that works across multiple applications with substantial improvement of signal-to-background ratio and information content. The Omni-ATAC protocol generates chromatin accessibility profiles from archival frozen tissue samples and 50-μm sections, revealing the activities of disease-associated DNA elements in distinct human brain structures. The Omni-ATAC protocol enables the interrogation of personal regulomes in tissue context and translational studies.

PMID:
28846090
PMCID:
PMC5623106
DOI:
10.1038/nmeth.4396
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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