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Nat Commun. 2017 Aug 25;8(1):357. doi: 10.1038/s41467-017-00424-8.

Tumor-selective catalytic nanomedicine by nanocatalyst delivery.

Huo M1,2, Wang L1,2,3, Chen Y4, Shi J5.

Author information

1
The State Key Laboratory of High Performance Ceramic and Superfine Microstructures, Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai, 200050, China.
2
University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, 100049, China.
3
School of Physical Science and Technology, ShanghaiTech University, Shanghai, 201210, China.
4
The State Key Laboratory of High Performance Ceramic and Superfine Microstructures, Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai, 200050, China. chenyu@mail.sic.ac.cn.
5
The State Key Laboratory of High Performance Ceramic and Superfine Microstructures, Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai, 200050, China. jlshi@mail.sic.ac.cn.

Abstract

Tumor cells metabolize in distinct pathways compared with most normal tissue cells. The resulting tumor microenvironment would provide characteristic physiochemical conditions for selective tumor modalities. Here we introduce a concept of sequential catalytic nanomedicine for efficient tumor therapy by designing and delivering biocompatible nanocatalysts into tumor sites. Natural glucose oxidase (GOD, enzyme catalyst) and ultrasmall Fe3O4 nanoparticles (inorganic nanozyme, Fenton reaction catalyst) have been integrated into the large pore-sized and biodegradable dendritic silica nanoparticles to fabricate the sequential nanocatalyst. GOD in sequential nanocatalyst could effectively deplete glucose in tumor cells, and meanwhile produce a considerable amount of H2O2 for subsequent Fenton-like reaction catalyzed by Fe3O4 nanoparticles in response to mild acidic tumor microenvironment. Highly toxic hydroxyl radicals are generated through these sequential catalytic reactions to trigger the apoptosis and death of tumor cells. The current work manifests a proof of concept of catalytic nanomedicine by approaching selectivity and efficiency concurrently for tumor therapeutics.The specific metabolism of cancer cells may allow for selective tumor therapeutics. Here, the authors show that a suitable combination of an enzyme and iron nanoparticles loaded on dendritic silica induces apoptosis of cancer cells in response to the glucose-reliant and mild acidic microenvironment.

PMID:
28842577
PMCID:
PMC5572465
DOI:
10.1038/s41467-017-00424-8
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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