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Nat Commun. 2017 Aug 25;8(1):360. doi: 10.1038/s41467-017-00512-9.

Hierarchically self-assembled hexagonal honeycomb and kagome superlattices of binary 1D colloids.

Author information

1
Department of Nuclear and Quantum Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, 291 Daehak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon, 34141, Republic of Korea.
2
Department of Chemistry and Research Institute for Basic Science, Sogang University, 35 Baekbeom-ro, Mapo-gu, Seoul, 04107, Republic of Korea.
3
European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, 71 Avenue des Martyrs, F-38043, Grenoble, France.
4
Department of Nuclear and Quantum Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, 291 Daehak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon, 34141, Republic of Korea. sungmin@kaist.ac.kr.

Abstract

Synthesis of binary nanoparticle superlattices has attracted attention for a broad spectrum of potential applications. However, this has remained challenging for one-dimensional nanoparticle systems. In this study, we investigate the packing behavior of one-dimensional nanoparticles of different diameters into a hexagonally packed cylindrical micellar system and demonstrate that binary one-dimensional nanoparticle superlattices of two different symmetries can be obtained by tuning particle diameter and mixing ratios. The hexagonal arrays of one-dimensional nanoparticles are embedded in the honeycomb lattices (for AB2 type) or kagome lattices (for AB3 type) of micellar cylinders. The maximization of free volume entropy is considered as the main driving force for the formation of superlattices, which is well supported by our theoretical free energy calculations. Our approach provides a route for fabricating binary one-dimensional nanoparticle superlattices and may be applicable for inorganic one-dimensional nanoparticle systems.Binary mixtures of 1D particles are rarely observed to cooperatively self-assemble into binary superlattices, as the particle types separate into phases. Here, the authors design a system that avoids phase separation, obtaining binary superlattices with different symmetries by simply tuning the particle diameter and mixture composition.

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