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Nat Commun. 2017 Aug 25;8(1):355. doi: 10.1038/s41467-017-00368-z.

CDYL suppresses epileptogenesis in mice through repression of axonal Nav1.6 sodium channel expression.

Liu Y1,2, Lai S1,2, Ma W3, Ke W4, Zhang C5, Liu S1, Zhang Y1, Pei F6, Li S3, Yi M5, Shu Y4, Shang Y1,7,8, Liang J9, Huang Z10,11,12.

Author information

1
Key Laboratory of Carcinogenesis and Translational Research (Ministry of Education), State Key Laboratory of Natural and Biomimetic Drugs, Beijing Key Laboratory of Protein Posttranslational Modifications and Cell Function, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Peking University Health Science Center, Beijing, 100191, China.
2
Department of Molecular and Cellular Pharmacology, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Peking University Health Science Center, Beijing, 100191, China.
3
Department of Neurology, Shengjing Hospital Affiliated to China Medical University, Shenyang, 110000, China.
4
State Key Laboratory of Cognitive Neuroscience and Learning and IDG/McGovern Institute for Brain Research, School of Brain and Cognitive Sciences, the Collaborative Innovation Center for Brain Science, Beijing Normal University, Beijing, 100875, China.
5
Neuroscience Research Institute & Department of Neurobiology, Peking University Health Science Center, Beijing, 100191, China.
6
Department of Pathology, Peking University Health Science Center, Beijing, 100191, China.
7
Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Capital Medical University, Beijing, 100069, China.
8
Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Tianjin Medical University, Tianjin, 300070, China.
9
Key Laboratory of Carcinogenesis and Translational Research (Ministry of Education), State Key Laboratory of Natural and Biomimetic Drugs, Beijing Key Laboratory of Protein Posttranslational Modifications and Cell Function, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Peking University Health Science Center, Beijing, 100191, China. liang_jing@bjmu.edu.cn.
10
Key Laboratory of Carcinogenesis and Translational Research (Ministry of Education), State Key Laboratory of Natural and Biomimetic Drugs, Beijing Key Laboratory of Protein Posttranslational Modifications and Cell Function, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Peking University Health Science Center, Beijing, 100191, China. huangz@hsc.pku.edu.cn.
11
Department of Molecular and Cellular Pharmacology, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Peking University Health Science Center, Beijing, 100191, China. huangz@hsc.pku.edu.cn.
12
State Key Laboratory of Organometallic Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai, 200032, China. huangz@hsc.pku.edu.cn.

Abstract

Impairment of intrinsic plasticity is involved in a range of neurological disorders such as epilepsy. However, how intrinsic excitability is regulated is still not fully understood. Here we report that the epigenetic factor Chromodomain Y-like (CDYL) protein is a critical regulator of the initiation and maintenance of intrinsic neuroplasticity by regulating voltage-gated ion channels in mouse brains. CDYL binds to a regulatory element in the intron region of SCN8A and mainly recruits H3K27me3 activity for transcriptional repression of the gene. Knockdown of CDYL in hippocampal neurons results in augmented Nav1.6 currents, lower neuronal threshold, and increased seizure susceptibility, whereas transgenic mice over-expressing CDYL exhibit higher neuronal threshold and are less prone to epileptogenesis. Finally, examination of human brain tissues reveals decreased CDYL and increased SCN8A in the temporal lobe epilepsy group. Together, our findings indicate CDYL is a critical player for experience-dependent gene regulation in controlling intrinsic excitability.Alterations in intrinsic plasticity are important in epilepsy. Here the authors show that the epigenetic factor CDYL regulates the gene expression of the voltage gated sodium channel, Nav1.6, which contributes to seizures in a rat model of epilepsy.

PMID:
28842554
PMCID:
PMC5572458
DOI:
10.1038/s41467-017-00368-z
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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