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Eat Weight Disord. 2017 Aug 24. doi: 10.1007/s40519-017-0428-3. [Epub ahead of print]

Key factors involved in obesity development.

Author information

1
State Key Laboratory of Plateau Ecology and Agriculture, Qinghai University, Xining, 810016, Qinghai, China.
2
Department of Medicine, Jishou University, Jishou, 41600, Hunan, China.
3
Key Laboratory of Agro-ecological Processes in Subtropical Region, Institute of Subtropical Agriculture, Chinese Academy of Sciences; National Engineering Laboratory for Pollution Control and Waste Utilization in Livestock and Poultry Production; Hunan Provincial Engineering Research Center for Healthy Livestock and Poultry Production; Scientific Observing and Experimental Station of Animal Nutrition and Feed Science in South-Central, Ministry of Agriculture, Changsha, Hunan, 410125, China. todyfly1@163.com.
4
University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, 100039, China. todyfly1@163.com.
5
State Key Laboratory of Plateau Ecology and Agriculture, Qinghai University, Xining, 810016, Qinghai, China. qhdxhsz@163.com.

Abstract

Obesity has been considered to be a chronic disease that requires medical prevention and treatment. Intriguingly, many factors, including adipose tissue dysfunction, mitochondrial dysfunction, alterations in the muscle fiber phenotype and in the gut microbiota composition, have been identified to be involved in the development of obesity and its associated metabolic disorders (in particular type 2 diabetes mellitus). In this narrative review, we will discuss our current understanding of the relationships of these factors and obesity development, and provide a summary of potential treatments to manage obesity. Level of Evidence Level V, narrative review.

KEYWORDS:

Adipose tissue dysfunction; Gut microbiota; Mitochondrial dysfunction; Myofibers; Obesity; Type 2 diabetes mellitus

PMID:
28840575
DOI:
10.1007/s40519-017-0428-3
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