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Obes Surg. 2018 Mar;28(3):748-759. doi: 10.1007/s11695-017-2883-3.

The Effects of Duodenojejunal Omega Switch in Combination with High-Fat Diet and Control Diet on Incretins, Body Weight, and Glucose Tolerance in Sprague-Dawley Rats.

Author information

1
Department of Physiology, School of Medicine with Dentistry Division in Zabrze, Medical University of Silesia, Katowice, Poland. dstygar@sum.edu.pl.
2
Department of Physiology, School of Medicine with Dentistry Division in Zabrze, Medical University of Silesia, Katowice, Poland.
3
Department of Instrumental Analysis, School of Pharmacy with the Division of Laboratory Medicine in Sosnowiec, Medical University of Silesia, Katowice, Poland.
4
Department of Histology and Embryology, School of Medicine with the Division of Dentistry, Medical University of Silesia, Zabrze, Poland.
5
Department of Pathology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Wrocław University of Environmental and Life Sciences, Wrocław, Poland.
6
Department of Animal Physiology and Ecotoxicology, Faculty of Biology and Environmental Protection, University of Silesia, Katowice, Poland.
7
Clinic of General, Visceral, Transplantation and Vascular Surgery, Hospital of the Ludwig Maximilian University, Munich, Germany.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Despite excellent results of bariatric surgery in the treatment of type 2 diabetes and weight loss in human subjects, some patients do not obtain desired results. One of the reasons for this is that not all patients follow caloric intake recommendations.

AIM:

The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of duodenojejunal omega switch (DJOS) surgery on body weight, glucose tolerance, and incretins in rats.

METHODS:

DJOS and SHAM surgery were performed on rats maintained for 8 weeks on high-fat diet (HF) and control diet (CD), respectively. After surgery, four groups were kept on the same diet as before the surgery, and four groups had a changed diet (CD vs. HF and HF vs. CD) for the next 8 weeks. Glucose tolerance, insulin tolerance, glucose-stimulated insulin, glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and gastric inhibitory polypeptide/glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) secretion, food intake, and body weight were measured.

RESULTS:

A change of diet after surgery resulted in reduced glucose tolerance. Plasma insulin levels were lowered between DJOS and SHAM surgeries for the HF/HF and CD/HF groups. DJOS surgery did not reduce body weight in the studied groups, irrespective of diet. In the HF/HF group, ΔGLP-1 was lower for DJOS surgery in comparison with other groups. Differences of weight changes were observed for groups HF/HF and HF/CD. After DJOS surgery, ΔGIP was lower in the CD/HF group compared with HF/HF.

CONCLUSIONS:

Our results show that applications of different types of diets, before and after surgery, is a sensitive method for studies of mechanism of glucose intolerance after DJOS surgery.

KEYWORDS:

Bariatric surgery; DJOS surgery; Experimental rat model; GIP; GLP-1; Glucose tolerance; Incretins; Insulin intolerance; OGTT; Obesity

PMID:
28840471
PMCID:
PMC5803292
DOI:
10.1007/s11695-017-2883-3
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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