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Science. 2017 Aug 25;357(6353):802-806. doi: 10.1126/science.aan4834.

Seasonal cycling in the gut microbiome of the Hadza hunter-gatherers of Tanzania.

Author information

1
Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA.
2
Human Food Project, 53600 Highway 118, Terlingua, TX 79852, USA.
3
The Department of Twin Research and Genetic Epidemiology, King's College London, St. Thomas' Hospital, Lambeth Palace Road, London SE1 7EH, UK.
4
Department of Chemical and Systems Biology, Stanford School of Medicine, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94025, USA.
5
Lawson Health Research Institute and Western University, London, Ontario N6A 4V2, Canada.
6
Departments of Pediatrics and Computer Science and Engineering and Center for Microbiome Innovation, University of California, San Diego, CA 92093, USA.
7
National Institute for Medical Research, Mwanza 11101, Tanzania.
8
School of Medicine and Department of Anthropology, New York University, New York, NY, USA.

Abstract

Although humans have cospeciated with their gut-resident microbes, it is difficult to infer features of our ancestral microbiome. Here, we examine the microbiome profile of 350 stool samples collected longitudinally for more than a year from the Hadza hunter-gatherers of Tanzania. The data reveal annual cyclic reconfiguration of the microbiome, in which some taxa become undetectable only to reappear in a subsequent season. Comparison of the Hadza data set with data collected from 18 populations in 16 countries with varying lifestyles reveals that gut community membership corresponds to modernization: Notably, the taxa within the Hadza that are the most seasonally volatile similarly differentiate industrialized and traditional populations. These data indicate that some dynamic lineages of microbes have decreased in prevalence and abundance in modernized populations.

Comment in

PMID:
28839072
PMCID:
PMC5891123
DOI:
10.1126/science.aan4834
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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