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Inflamm Bowel Dis. 2017 Dec;23(12):2072-2082. doi: 10.1097/MIB.0000000000001108.

Dietary Polyphenols in the Aetiology of Crohn's Disease and Ulcerative Colitis-A Multicenter European Prospective Cohort Study (EPIC).

Author information

1
1Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom; 2Program in Public Health, College of Health Sciences, University of California, Irvine, California; 3Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; 4Biomarker Group, Nutrition and Metabolism Section, International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC), Lyon, France; 5Unit of Nutrition and Cancer, Cancer Epidemiology Research Programme, Catalan Institute of Oncology, Bellvitge Biomedical Research Institute (IDIBELL), Barcelona, Spain; 6Department of Medicine, Norwich Medical School, University of East Anglia, Norwich, United Kingdom; 7Norfolk and Norwich University Hospital NHS Trust, Norwich, United Kingdom; 8Strangeways Research Laboratory, Institute of Public Health, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom; 9Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, the Netherlands; 10Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Nutritional Research, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden; 11Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, GI Unit, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden; 12Department of Clinical Sciences, University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden; 13Cancer Epidemiology Unit, Nuffield Department of Population Health, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom; 14Department of Epidemiology, German Institute of Human Nutrition, Potsdam, Germany; 15Department of Public Health, Section for Epidemiology, Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark; 16Molecular and Nutritional Epidemiology Unit, Cancer Research and Prevention Centre, Florence, Italy; 17INSERM, Centre for Research in Epidemiology and Population Health, U1018, Team 9, Institut Gustave Roussy, Villejuif, France; 18Université Paris Sud, UMRS 1018, Villejuif, France; 19Department of Gastroenterology, Bicêtre University Hospital, Assistance Publique des Hôpitaux de Paris, Le Kremlin Bicêtre, France; 20Institute of Molecular Medicine, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark; 21Focused Research Unit for Molecular and Clinical Research, Institute of Regional Research- Center Sønderjylland, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark; 22Laboratory Center, Hospital of Southern Jutland, Aabenraa, Denmark; 23Institute of Cancer Epidemiology, Danish Cancer Society, Copenhagen, Denmark; 24Division of Clinical Epidemiology, DKFZ-German Cancer Research Centre, Heidelberg, Germany; 25Cancer Registry and Histopathology Unit, "Civic-M.P.Arezzo" Hospital, ASP Ragusa, Italy; and 26WHO Collaborating Center for Food and Nutrition Policies, Athens, Greece.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Oxidative stress may be involved in the aetiology of inflammatory bowel disease and whether dietary polyphenols, which possess antioxidants properties, prevent its development is unknown.

METHODS:

A total of 401,326 men and women aged 20 to 80 years from 8 countries were recruited between 1991 and 1998 and at baseline completed validated food frequency questionnaires. Dietary polyphenol intake was measured using Phenol-Explorer, a database with information on the content of 502 polyphenols. Incident cases of Crohn's diseases (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC) were identified during the follow-up period of up to December 2010. A nested case-control study using conditional logistic regression estimated the odds ratios (ORs), and 95% confidence intervals, for polyphenol intake (categories based on quartiles) and developing CD or UC.

RESULTS:

In total, 110 CD (73% women) and 244 UC (57% women) cases were identified and matched to 440 and 976 controls, respectively. Total polyphenol intake was not associated with CD (P trend = 0.17) or UC (P trend = 0.16). For flavones and CD, there were reduced odds for all quartiles, which were statistically significant for the third (OR3rd versus 1st quartile = 0.33; 95% confidence interval, 0.15-0.69) and there was an inverse trend across quartiles (P = 0.03). Similarly, for resveratrol, there was an inverse association with CD (OR4th versus 1st quartile = 0.40; 95% confidence interval, 0.20-0.82) with an inverse trend across quartiles (P = 0.02). No significant associations between subtypes of polyphenols and UC were found. Effect modification by smoking in CD was documented with borderline statistical significance.

CONCLUSIONS:

The data supports a potential role of flavones and resveratrol in the risk of developing CD; future aetiological studies should investigate these dietary components and further examine the potential for residual confounding.

PMID:
28837515
DOI:
10.1097/MIB.0000000000001108
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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