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Development. 2017 Dec 1;144(23):4462-4472. doi: 10.1242/dev.150557. Epub 2017 Aug 23.

Multi-scale quantification of tissue behavior during amniote embryo axis elongation.

Author information

1
Department of Development and Stem cells, Institut de Génétique et de Biologie Moléculaire et Cellulaire (IGBMC), CNRS (UMR 7104), Inserm U964, Université de Strasbourg, 67400 Illkirch Graffenstaden, France bertrand.benazeraf@univ-tlse3.fr pourquie@genetics.med.harvard.edu paulf@physics.mcgill.ca rustylansford@gmail.com.
2
Department of Radiology and Developmental Neuroscience Program, Saban Research Institute, Children's Hospital Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90027, USA.
3
Department of Physics, Ernest Rutherford Physics Building, McGill University, 3600 rue University, Montréal, QC, H3A 2T8, Canada.
4
Northern Michigan University, Computer Science and Mathematics Department, Marquette, MI 49855, USA.
5
Department of Biological Sciences, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90089, USA.
6
Department of Pathology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, 60 Fenwood Road, Boston, MA 02115, USA.
7
Department of Genetics, Harvard Medical School, 60 Fenwood Road, Boston, MA 02115, USA.
8
Harvard Stem Cell Institute, 60 Fenwood Road, Boston, MA 02115, USA.
9
Department of Physics, Ernest Rutherford Physics Building, McGill University, 3600 rue University, Montréal, QC, H3A 2T8, Canada bertrand.benazeraf@univ-tlse3.fr pourquie@genetics.med.harvard.edu paulf@physics.mcgill.ca rustylansford@gmail.com.
10
Department of Radiology and Developmental Neuroscience Program, Saban Research Institute, Children's Hospital Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90027, USA bertrand.benazeraf@univ-tlse3.fr pourquie@genetics.med.harvard.edu paulf@physics.mcgill.ca rustylansford@gmail.com.
11
Department of Radiology and Development, Stem Cells, and Regenerative Medicine (DSR), Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90033, USA.

Abstract

Embryonic axis elongation is a complex multi-tissue morphogenetic process responsible for the formation of the posterior part of the amniote body. How movements and growth are coordinated between the different posterior tissues (e.g. neural tube, axial and paraxial mesoderm, lateral plate, ectoderm, endoderm) to drive axis morphogenesis remain largely unknown. Here, we use quail embryos to quantify cell behavior and tissue movements during elongation. We quantify the tissue-specific contribution to axis elongation using 3D volumetric techniques, then quantify tissue-specific parameters such as cell density and proliferation. To study cell behavior at a multi-tissue scale, we used high-resolution 4D imaging of transgenic quail embryos expressing fluorescent proteins. We developed specific tracking and image analysis techniques to analyze cell motion and compute tissue deformations in 4D. This analysis reveals extensive sliding between tissues during axis extension. Further quantification of tissue tectonics showed patterns of rotations, contractions and expansions, which are consistent with the multi-tissue behavior observed previously. Our approach defines a quantitative and multi-scale method to analyze the coordination between tissue behaviors during early vertebrate embryo morphogenetic events.

KEYWORDS:

Axis elongation; Confocal microscopy; Live imaging; Morphogenesis; Multi-tissue; PSM; Proliferation; Quail embryo; Tissue deformations

PMID:
28835474
DOI:
10.1242/dev.150557
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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