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Microb Biotechnol. 2017 Sep;10(5):1250-1253. doi: 10.1111/1751-7915.12832. Epub 2017 Aug 22.

Microbial biotechnology as a tool to restore degraded drylands.

Author information

1
Departamento de Biología y Geología, Física y Química Inorgánica, Escuela Superior de Ciencias Experimentales y Tecnología, Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, c/ Tulipán s/n, 28933, Móstoles, Spain.
2
ICREA-Complex Systems Lab, Universitat Pompeu Fabra, Dr Aiguader 88, 08003, Barcelona, Spain.
3
Institut de Biologia Evolutiva, CSIC-UPF, Pg Maritim de la Barceloneta 37, 08003, Barcelona, Spain.
4
Santa Fe Institute, 1399 Hyde Park Road, Santa Fe, NM, 87501, USA.
5
Hawkesbury Institute for the Environment, Western Sydney University, Penrith, 2751, NSW, Australia.
6
Global Centre for Land-Based Innovation, Western Sydney University, Penrith, 2751, NSW, Australia.

Abstract

We briefly review how microbial biotechnology can contribute to improve activities aiming to restore degraded drylands and to combat their desertification, which are an integral part of the Sustainable Development Goal 15 of the 2030 Agenda. Microbial biotechnology offers notable promise to improve restoration actions based on the use of biocrust-forming engineered cyanobacteria, which play key roles in maintaining ecosystem structure and functioning in drylands worldwide. Advances in our understanding of microbiome associated to biocrusts and of the signalling involved in the communication among their constituents can also potentially enhance the outcome of restoration activities in drylands.

PMID:
28834240
PMCID:
PMC5609258
DOI:
10.1111/1751-7915.12832
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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