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Adv Mater. 2017 Oct;29(39). doi: 10.1002/adma.201703026. Epub 2017 Aug 18.

Significant Performance Enhancement of Polymer Resins by Bioinspired Dynamic Bonding.

Author information

1
Marine Science Institute, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA, 93106, USA.
2
Materials Research Laboratory, Materials Research Science and Engineering Center, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA, 93106, USA.
3
Biomaterials Science, Pusan National University, Miryang, 627-706, South Korea.
4
Energy and Chemical Engineering, Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology, Ulsan, 689-798, South Korea.
5
Chemical Engineering, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA, 93106, USA.
6
Dental Research Institute and Biomaterials Science, Dentistry, Seoul National University, Seoul, 110-749, South Korea.
7
Fundamental Chemistry, Federal University of Pernambuco, Recife, PE, 50740-670, Brazil.
8
Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA, 93106, USA.
9
Mechanical Engineering, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA, 93106, USA.
10
Chemistry, Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology, Ulsan, 689-798, South Korea.
11
Aggeu Magalhaes Institute, Oswaldo Cruz Foundation, Recife, PE, 50670-465, Brazil.

Abstract

Marine mussels use catechol-rich interfacial mussel foot proteins (mfps) as primers that attach to mineral surfaces via hydrogen, metal coordination, electrostatic, ionic, or hydrophobic bonds, creating a secondary surface that promotes bonding to the bulk mfps. Inspired by this biological adhesive primer, it is shown that a ≈1 nm thick catecholic single-molecule priming layer increases the adhesion strength of crosslinked polymethacrylate resin on mineral surfaces by up to an order of magnitude when compared with conventional primers such as noncatecholic silane- and phosphate-based grafts. Molecular dynamics simulations confirm that catechol groups anchor to a variety of mineral surfaces and shed light on the binding mode of each molecule. Here, a ≈50% toughness enhancement is achieved in a stiff load-bearing polymer network, demonstrating the utility of mussel-inspired bonding for processing a wide range of polymeric interfaces, including structural, load-bearing materials.

KEYWORDS:

adhesion; dynamic bonding; mussels; primer; surfaces

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