Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Int J Occup Med Environ Health. 2017 Oct 6;30(6):897-908. doi: 10.13075/ijomeh.1896.01063. Epub 2017 Aug 22.

Poisoning deaths in Poland: Types and frequencies reported in Łódź, Kraków, Sosnowiec, Gdańsk, Wrocław and Poznań during 2009-2013.

Author information

1
Nofer Institute of Occupational Medicine, Łódź, Poland (Department of Toxicology, Toxicology Unit). annakrak@imp.lodz.pl.
2
Nofer Institute of Occupational Medicine, Łódź, Poland (Department of Toxicology, Poison Information Centre). piekarska@imp.lodz.pl.
3
Nofer Institute of Occupational Medicine, Łódź, Poland (Department of Toxicology, Poison Information Centre). kasind@imp.lodz.pl.
4
Nofer Institute of Occupational Medicine, Łódź, Poland (Department of Toxicology, Poison Information Centre). annarog@imp.lodz.pl.
5
Nofer Institute of Occupational Medicine, Łódź, Poland (Department of Radiological Protection). piopolit@imp.lodz.pl.
6
Jagiellonian University Medical College, Kraków, Poland (Department of Clinical Toxicology). piodzik@poczta.onet.pl.
7
Jagiellonian University Medical College, Kraków, Poland (Poison Information Centre). szkolbe@cm-uj.krakow.pl.
8
Institute of Occupational Medicine and Environmental Health, Sosnowiec, Poland (Regional Poisons Control Centre). t.klopotowski@gmail.com.
9
Institute of Occupational Medicine and Environmental Health, Sosnowiec, Poland (Regional Poisons Control Centre). yaris22@wp.pl.
10
T. Marciniak Lower Silesian Specialized Hospital - Emergency Medicine Centre, Wrocław, Poland. bmporebs@mp.pl.
11
T. Marciniak Lower Silesian Specialized Hospital - Emergency Medicine Centre, Wrocław, Poland. ooz.ww@interia.pl.
12
Pomeranian Center of Toxicology, Gdańsk, Poland. w.waldman@pctox.pl.
13
Pomeranian Center of Toxicology, Gdańsk, Poland. j.anand@pctox.pl.
14
University of Medical Sciences, Poznań, Poland (Department of Emergency Medicine). eryk.m@wp.pl.
15
University of Medical Sciences, Poznań, Poland (Department of Emergency Medicine). magda.glebocka@op.pl.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

The aim of this study has been to assess the characteristics of acute poisoning deaths in Poland over a period of time 2009-2013.

MATERIAL AND METHODS:

The analysis was based on the data obtained from the patient records stored in toxicology departments in 6 cities - Łódź, Kraków, Sosnowiec, Gdańsk, Wrocław and Poznań. Toxicological analyses were routinely performed in blood and/or urine. Major toxic substances were classified to one of the following categories: pharmaceuticals, alcohol group poisonings (ethanol and other alcohols), gases, solvents, drugs of abuse, pesticides, metals, mushrooms, others. Cases were analyzed according to the following criteria: year, age and gender of analyzed patients, toxic substance category and type of poisoning. The recorded fatal poisonings were classified according to the International Classification of Diseases.

RESULTS:

The record of 261 deaths were retrospectively reviewed. There were 187 males (71.64%) and 74 females (28.36%) and the male to female ratio was 2.52. Alcohol group poisonings were more frequently responsible for deaths in men compared to all poisonings, 91.1% vs. 71.6%, respectively (p < 0.05), and pharmaceutical agents were more frequently responsible for deaths in women, 47.4% vs. 28.4%, (p < 0.05). Methanol was the most common agent in the alcohol group poisonings, accounting for 43.75% (N = 49), followed by ethylene glycol, 39.29% (N = 44), and ethanol, 16.96% (N = 19).

CONCLUSIONS:

Epidemiological profile data from investigation of poisoning deaths in Poland may be very useful for the development of preventive programs. Int J Occup Med Environ Health 2017;30(6):897-908.

KEYWORDS:

Poland; epidemiology; fatal poisonings; mortality; poisoning death; retrospective study

PMID:
28832029
DOI:
10.13075/ijomeh.1896.01063
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free full text

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Nofer Institute of Occupational Medicine
Loading ...
Support Center