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Prev Med Rep. 2017 Aug 5;8:18-24. doi: 10.1016/j.pmedr.2017.07.008. eCollection 2017 Dec.

Dimensions of sexual orientation and sleep disturbance among young adults.

Author information

1
Department of Health and Behavioral Sciences, University of Colorado Denver, North Classroom Building, Room 3018, Denver, CO, 80217, United States.
2
Department of Social Science, University College London, 20 Bedford Way, London, WC1H 0AL, United Kingdom.

Abstract

We examined associations among 3 dimensions of sexual orientation (identity, attraction, and behavior) and sleep disturbance among young adults in the United States. Using Wave IV of the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (respondents aged 24-32, N = 14,334), we ran multivariate logistic regressions to estimate the probability of reporting trouble falling asleep, trouble staying asleep, and short sleep duration, based on specific sexual orientation categories. Results after controlling for mental health indicate that these categories are more likely to have trouble falling asleep: women who identify as "bisexual" (OR = 1.85, CI: 1.21,2.82), women attracted to "both sexes" (OR = 1.31, CI: 1.00,1.72), women who have had "mostly opposite sex" partners (OR = 1.40, CI: 1.10,1.77), and men who have had "mostly same sex" partners (OR = 2.28, CI: 1.21,4.31). For trouble staying asleep: women who identify as "bisexual" (OR = 1.48, CI: 1.01,2.18), men and women attracted to "both sexes" (OR = 1.81, CI: 1.12,2.91; OR = 1.27, CI: 1.00,1.60), and women who have had "mostly opposite sex partners" (OR = 1.38, CI: 1.13,1.69). For short sleep duration: women who identify as "mostly straight" or "mostly gay" (OR = 1.27, CI: 1.01,1.60; OR = 2.64, CI: 1.36,5.14), men who identify as "bisexual" (OR = 2.56, CI: 1.26,5.18), women attracted only to "same sex" (OR = 2.42, CI: 1.48,3.96), men attracted to "both sexes" (OR = 1.88, CI: 1.21,2.93), and women who have had "mostly same sex" partners (OR = 4.90, CI: 2.10,11.46). Given the variation in findings, it is necessary to analyze each sexual orientation dimension and the categories within each dimension to adequately understand sleep disturbances among sexual minority populations.

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