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J Endourol. 2017 Oct;31(10):1019-1025. doi: 10.1089/end.2017.0554. Epub 2017 Sep 26.

Erosion of Embolization Coils into the Renal Collecting System: Removal with Prone Transradial Renal Arteriography and Nephroscopy.

Author information

1
1 Division of Vascular and Interventional Radiology, Department of Radiology, University of Michigan Health Systems , Ann Arbor, Michigan.
2
2 Department of Radiology, University of Michigan Medical School , Ann Arbor, Michigan.
3
3 Duke University , Durham, North Carolina.
4
4 Department of Surgery and Perioperative Care, Dell Medical School, The University of Texas at Austin , Austin, Texas.
5
5 Department of Urology, University of Michigan Health Systems , Ann Arbor, Michigan.

Abstract

INTRODUCTION:

Removal of embolization coils eroded into the renal collecting system poses a risk of hemorrhage, which may need to be addressed with arteriography and embolization at the time of treatment. The purpose of this report is to describe a novel approach, by which prone percutaneous nephroscopic coil retrieval is coupled with simultaneous prone transradial renal arterial access to mitigate this potential complication.

METHODS:

A retrospective chart review of the electronic medical record systems was performed from January 2008 to May 2017 to identify patients who had undergone percutaneous removal of embolization coils eroded into the renal collecting system. Patients who had migration of embolization coils into the renal collecting system who were symptomatic with pain, hydronephrosis, or infection were considered for inclusion. Patients who had coil migration, but were asymptomatic were not offered removal. Patient demographics and case characteristics were examined as were operative outcomes.

RESULTS:

A total of three patients fulfilled the study criteria. Migrated embolization coils were able to be effectively removed in all patients. Of the patients, two underwent simultaneous prone transradial renal arteriography with placement of an occlusion balloon catheter into the segmental artery of interest. In one patient, significant arterial bleeding was encountered after coil removal, which was effectively addressed with simultaneous arteriography and glue embolization.

CONCLUSION:

Erosion of embolization coils into the renal collecting system, while rare, may be a significant long-term complication of coil embolization. Combining nephroscopy with prone transradial arteriography in preparation for procedure-associated hemorrhage may make removal of migrated coils safer.

KEYWORDS:

coils retrieval; interventional radiology; migrated embolization coil; nephroscopy; prone transradial access; renal embolization; transradial access; urology

PMID:
28830216
DOI:
10.1089/end.2017.0554
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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