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Methods Mol Biol. 2017;1660:355-364. doi: 10.1007/978-1-4939-7253-1_29.

An Integrated Double-Filtration Microfluidic Device for Detection of Extracellular Vesicles from Urine for Bladder Cancer Diagnosis.

Liang LG1,2,3, Sheng YF1,2,3, Zhou S4, Inci F4, Li L1,2, Demirci U5,6, Wang S1,2,3,4.

Author information

1
State Key Laboratory for Diagnosis and Treatment of Infectious Diseases, First Affiliated Hospital, College of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, Zhejiang Province, 310003, China.
2
Collaborative Innovation Center for Diagnosis and Treatment of Infectious Diseases, Hangzhou, Zhejiang Province, 310003, China.
3
Institute for Translational Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, Zhejiang Province, 310029, China.
4
Department of Radiology, Bio-Acoustic MEMS in Medicine (BAMM) Laboratory, Canary Center at Stanford for Cancer Early Detection, Stanford School of Medicine, Palo Alto, CA, 94304, USA.
5
Department of Radiology, Bio-Acoustic MEMS in Medicine (BAMM) Laboratory, Canary Center at Stanford for Cancer Early Detection, Stanford School of Medicine, Palo Alto, CA, 94304, USA. utkan@stanford.edu.
6
Department of Electrical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, 94305, USA. utkan@stanford.edu.

Abstract

Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are present in a variety of bodily fluids and they play an important role in cellular communications and signal transduction mechanisms. Studies have shown that the number of EVs and EV-associated biomarkers (i.e., proteins, nucleic acids and lipids) can be used to aid clinical diagnosis. Although ultracentrifugation is commonly used for EV isolation, it is not practical for clinical settings. Here, we developed an integrated double-filtration device that isolated and enriched EVs from urine, and subsequently detected/quantified EVs from urine via microchip ELISA. Results showed that the concentration of EVs was significantly elevated compared to healthy controls. Receiver operating characteristic analysis demonstrated that this integrated EV quantification device had a sensitivity of 81.3% at a specificity of 90% (16 bladder cancer patients and eight healthy controls). Thus, this integrated device shows great potential to supplement urine cytology for diagnosis of bladder cancer in point-of-care (POC) settings.

KEYWORDS:

Bladder cancer; Diagnostics; Extracellular vesicles (EVs); Filtration; Microchip ELISA

PMID:
28828671
DOI:
10.1007/978-1-4939-7253-1_29
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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