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C R Biol. 2017 Sep - Oct;340(9-10):446-452. doi: 10.1016/j.crvi.2017.07.003. Epub 2017 Aug 18.

Environmental endocrine disruptors: New diabetogens?

Author information

1
CHU de Nice, Hôpital de l'Archet 2, Service d'endocrinologie, diabétologie et reproduction, 06202 Nice, France; Institut national de la santé et de la recherche médicale (INSERM) UMR U1065/UCA, Centre méditerranéen de médecine moléculaire (C3M), Équipe 5 "Environnement, reproduction et cancers hormono-dépendants", 06202 Nice, France. Electronic address: fenichel.p@chu-nice.fr.
2
CHU de Nice, Hôpital de l'Archet 2, Service d'endocrinologie, diabétologie et reproduction, 06202 Nice, France; Institut national de la santé et de la recherche médicale (INSERM) UMR U1065/UCA, Centre méditerranéen de médecine moléculaire (C3M), Équipe 5 "Environnement, reproduction et cancers hormono-dépendants", 06202 Nice, France.

Abstract

The prevalence of type-2 diabetes has dramatically increased worldwide during the last few decades. While lifestyle factors (sedentariness, noxious food), together with genetic susceptibility, are well-known actors, there is accumulating evidence suggesting that endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) may also play a pathophysiological role in the occurrence of metabolic diseases. Both experimental and epidemiological evidence support a role for early and chronic exposure to low doses of chemical pollutants with endocrine and metabolic disrupting effects. Most are present in the food chain and accumulate in the fat mass after absorption. In rodents, bisphenol A stimulates synthesis and secretion of pancreatic β cells and disturbs insulin signaling in liver, muscle and adipose tissue through epigenetic changes leading to insulin resistance and β cell impairment. In humans, epidemiological reports show statistical link between exposure to pesticides, polychlorinated bisphenyls, bisphenol A, phthalates, dioxins or aromatic polycyclic hydrocarbides or heavy metals and DT2 after acute accidental releases or early in life and/or chronic, low doses exposure. More prospective, longitudinal studies are needed to determine the importance of such environmental risk factors.

KEYWORDS:

Chemical pollutants; Diabète de type 2; Endocrine disruptors; Fetal programing; Obesity; Obésité; Perturbateurs endocriniens; Polluants chimiques; Programmation fœtale; Type-2 diabetes; Xenoestrogens; Xénœstrogènes

PMID:
28826789
DOI:
10.1016/j.crvi.2017.07.003
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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