Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Injury. 2017 Oct;48(10):2140-2144. doi: 10.1016/j.injury.2017.08.020. Epub 2017 Aug 11.

Orthopaedic injuries among electric bicycle users.

Author information

1
Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Chaim Sheba Medical Center at Tel Hashomer, Affiliated to the Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Israel. Electronic address: shaytmd@gmail.com.
2
Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Chaim Sheba Medical Center at Tel Hashomer, Affiliated to the Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Israel. Electronic address: wlwldaniel@gmail.com.
3
Emory University School Medicine, Department of Orthopedics. 59 Executive Park South Atlanta, GA 30329, USA. Electronic address: Jason.bariteau@gmail.com.
4
National Center for Trauma and Emergency Medicine Research, Gertner Institute for Epidemiology and Health Policy Research, Tel Hashomer, Israel. Electronic address: AdiG@gertner.health.gov.il.
5
National Center for Trauma and Emergency Medicine Research, Gertner Institute for Epidemiology and Health Policy Research, Tel Hashomer, Israel; Disaster Medicine Department, Faculty of Medicine, Tel-Aviv University, Israel. Electronic address: KobiP@gertner.health.gov.il.
6
Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Chaim Sheba Medical Center at Tel Hashomer, Affiliated to the Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Israel. Electronic address: ranthein@gmail.com.

Abstract

INTRODUCTION:

The use of electric bicycles (E-bike) has dramatically increased. E-bikes offer convenient, environmental-friendly, and less expensive alternative to other forms of transport. However, E-bikes provide a new public health challenge in terms of safety and injury prevention. This study is the first to specifically investigate the E-bike related orthopaedic injuries, based on a national trauma registry.

METHODS:

Data from a National Trauma Registry were reviewed for patients hospitalized following E-bike related injuries. Between Jan 2014 to Dec 2015, a total of 549 patients were reviewed. Data were analyzed according to demography, type of orthopaedic injury, associated injuries and severity, injury mechanism and treatment in the operating room.

RESULTS:

A total of 360 (65%) patients sustained orthopaedic injuries, out of them 230 (63.8%) sustained limb/pelvis/spine fractures. Lower extremity fractures were more prevalent than upper extremity fractures (p<0.001). The tibia was the most fractured bone (19.2%). Patients over the age of 50 years were at the highest risk for spine (20. 5%, p=0.0001), pelvis (15.9%, p=0.0001) and femoral neck (15.9%, p=0.0172) fractures relative to other age groups. Approximately 42% of patients sustained associated injuries, with head/neck/face injuries being the most prevalent (30.3%). followed by chest (11.9%) and abdominal injury (13.3%). A collision between E-bike and a motorized vehicle was the mechanism of injury in 35% of cases. In this mechanism of injury, patients had 1.7 times the risk for associated injuries (p<0.0001) and the risk for major trauma (ISS score ≥16) was more than the double (p=0.03). One third of patients with orthopaedic injuries required treatment in the operating room. Treatment varied depending on the type of fracture.

CONCLUSIONS:

This study provides unique information on epidemiological characteristics of orthpaedic injuries caused be E-bikes, pertinent both to medical care providers, as well as to health policy-makers allocating resources and formulating prevention strategies.

KEYWORDS:

Bicycle; E-bike; Electric bicycle; Fractures; Orthopaedic injury; Trauma

PMID:
28826652
DOI:
10.1016/j.injury.2017.08.020
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center