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AIDS Behav. 2018 Feb;22(2):388-401. doi: 10.1007/s10461-017-1890-7.

Factors Supporting and Hindering Adherence to Rectal Microbicide Gel Use with Receptive Anal Intercourse in a Phase 2 Trial.

Author information

1
HIV Center for Clinical and Behavioral Studies at New York State Psychiatric Institute and Columbia University, New York, NY, USA. rebecca.giguere@nyspi.columbia.edu.
2
HIV Center for Clinical and Behavioral Studies, Unit 15, New York State Psychiatric Institute, 1051 Riverside Drive, New York, NY, 10032, USA. rebecca.giguere@nyspi.columbia.edu.
3
HIV Center for Clinical and Behavioral Studies at New York State Psychiatric Institute and Columbia University, New York, NY, USA.
4
Department of Psychology, Syracuse University, Syracuse, NY, USA.
5
Department of Medicine, Center for AIDS Prevention Studies, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, USA.
6
San Francisco Department of Public Health, San Francisco, CA, USA.
7
The Fenway Institute, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA.
8
Asociación Civil Impacta Salud y Educación, Lima, Peru.
9
University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, USA.

Abstract

Adherence to product use in biomedical HIV prevention trials is essential to success. In MTN-017, a Phase 2 rectal microbicide gel trial, participants discussed applicator-inserted gel use in the context of receptive anal intercourse (RAI) with adherence counselors. We analyzed counseling session data to identify barriers to and facilitators of gel use for 26 participants in the United States who used gel with RAI as their first of three study regimens. The most common barriers were finding the gel application process cumbersome, physical discomfort after applying gel, difficulty with BAT-24 dosage regimen, and negative effects of gel on sex. The most common facilitators were incorporating gel use into routines, using gel in anticipation of sex, carrying gel when going out, reminders received via short message service, and ease of gel use. These findings can inform product development and future adherence counseling interventions for rectal gel trials to improve adherence outcomes.

KEYWORDS:

Adherence; Counseling; HIV; Microbicide; Text messaging

PMID:
28825142
PMCID:
PMC5818328
DOI:
10.1007/s10461-017-1890-7
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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