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Early Hum Dev. 2017 Dec;115:9-15. doi: 10.1016/j.earlhumdev.2017.08.002. Epub 2017 Aug 17.

Maternal obesity and attention-related symptoms in the preterm offspring.

Author information

1
Department of Health and Life Sciences, Faculty of Earth and Life Sciences, VU University, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. Electronic address: j.w.vander.burg@vu.nl.
2
Department of Epidemiology and Prevention, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC, United States.
3
Department of Health and Life Sciences, Faculty of Earth and Life Sciences, VU University, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
4
Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA, United States.
5
Department of Pediatrics (Neonatology), Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, NC, United States.
6
Division of Neurology (Pediatric Neurology), Department of Pediatrics, Boston Medical Center and Boston University, Boston, MA, United States.
7
Neuroepidemiology Unit, Department of Neurology, Boston Children's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, United States.
8
Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Neuroscience, The University of Chicago School of Medicine Comer Children's Hospital, Chicago, IL, United States.
9
Department of Allied Health Sciences, University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, NC, United States.
10
Department of Public Health and Community Medicine, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, MA, United States; Perinatal Epidemiology Unit, Hannover Medical School, Hannover, Germany.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Maternal pre-pregnancy obesity, in term-born children, is associated with an increased risk of attention problems, however this relationship has not been explored among children born extremely preterm.

AIM:

To estimate the risk of attention problems at age 10years in children born very preterm to overweight (i.e., body mass index (BMI) 25-29kg/m2) and obese (i.e., BMI≥30kg/m2) women relative to the risk among children born to women who were neither overweight nor obese (i.e. BMI<25kg/m2).

STUDY DESIGN:

Multi-center prospective cohort study.

METHODS:

A total of 764 children born before the 28th week of gestation and whose mother's pre-pregnancy height and pre-pregnancy weight were obtained at birth had an IQ≥70 at age 10years when parents and teachers completed Child Symptom Inventory-4 questionnaires that included items about the presence of ADHD.

RESULTS:

Compared to children whose mother's pre-pregnancy weight was in the normal range (BMI<25kg/m2), children were at increased risk of parent-identified ADHD behaviors if their mother was overweight (odds ratio (OR)=1.9; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.1, 3.3), or obese (OR=2.3; 95% CI: 1.4, 3.9). They were not at increased risk of teacher-identified ADHD characteristics if their mother was overweight before her pregnancy (OR=1.0; 95% CI: 0.6, 1.8), or obese (OR=1.0; 95% CI: 0.6, 1.6).

CONCLUSION:

Maternal overweight and obesity are associated with increased risk of parent-identified ADHD characteristics at 10years of age in children born extremely preterm.

PMID:
28822870
PMCID:
PMC6082429
DOI:
10.1016/j.earlhumdev.2017.08.002
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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