Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Am J Prev Med. 2017 Nov;53(5):e165-e174. doi: 10.1016/j.amepre.2017.06.018. Epub 2017 Aug 14.

Modifiable Lifestyle Risk Factors and Incident Diabetes in African Americans.

Author information

1
Department of Medicine, The Ohio State University, Wexner Medical Center, Columbus, Ohio; Johns Hopkins University, School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland. Electronic address: joseph.117@osu.edu.
2
Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Hypertension, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts; Rollins School of Public Health, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia.
3
Sumner M. Redstone Global Center for Prevention and Wellness, Milken Institute School of Public Health at the George Washington University, Washington, District of Columbia.
4
Division of Public Health Sciences, Wake Forest University, School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, North Carolina.
5
University of Mississippi Medical Center, Jackson, Mississippi.
6
Department of Preventive Medicine, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois.
7
Department of Medicine, The Ohio State University, Wexner Medical Center, Columbus, Ohio.
8
Johns Hopkins University, School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland.

Abstract

INTRODUCTION:

The associations of modifiable lifestyle risk factors with incident diabetes are not well investigated in African Americans (AAs). This study investigated the association of modifiable lifestyle risk factors (exercise, diet, smoking, TV watching, and sleep-disordered breathing burden) with incident diabetes among AAs.

METHODS:

Modifiable lifestyle risk factors were characterized among 3,252 AAs in the Jackson Heart Study who were free of diabetes at baseline (2000-2004) using baseline questionnaires and combined into risk factor categories: poor (0-3 points), average (4-7 points), and optimal (8-11 points). Incidence rate ratios (IRR) for diabetes (fasting glucose ≥126 mg/dL, physician diagnosis, use of diabetes drugs, or glycosylated hemoglobin A1c ≥6.5%) were estimated using Poisson regression modeling adjusting for age, sex, education, occupation, systolic blood pressure, and BMI. Outcomes were collected 2005-2012 and data analyzed in 2016.

RESULTS:

Over 7.6 years, there were 560 incident diabetes cases (mean age=53.3 years, 64% female). An average or optimal compared to poor risk factor categorization was associated with a 21% (IRR=0.79, 95% CI=0.62, 0.99) and 31% (IRR=0.69, 95% CI=0.48, 1.01) lower risk of diabetes. Among participants with BMI <30, IRRs for average or optimal compared to poor categorization were 0.60 (95% CI=0.40, 0.91) and 0.53 (95% CI=0.29, 0.97) versus 0.90 (95% CI=0.67, 1.21) and 0.83 (95% CI=0.51, 1.34) among participants with BMI ≥30.

CONCLUSIONS:

A combination of modifiable lifestyle factors are associated with a lower risk of diabetes among AAs, particularly among those without obesity.

PMID:
28818415
PMCID:
PMC5704929
DOI:
10.1016/j.amepre.2017.06.018
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center