Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Am J Prev Med. 2017 Sep;53(3S1):S47-S54. doi: 10.1016/j.amepre.2017.05.023.

Estimation of Breast Cancer Incident Cases and Medical Care Costs Attributable to Alcohol Consumption Among Insured Women Aged <45 Years in the U.S.

Author information

1
Division of Cancer Prevention and Control, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia. Electronic address: dce3@cdc.gov.
2
RTI International, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina.
3
Division of Cancer Prevention and Control, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia.
4
Department of Health Policy and Management, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina.

Abstract

INTRODUCTION:

This study estimated the percentage of breast cancer cases, total number of incident cases, and total annual medical care costs attributable to alcohol consumption among insured younger women (aged 18-44 years) by type of insurance and stage at diagnosis.

METHODS:

The study used the 2012-2013 National Survey on Drug Use and Health, cancer incidence data from two national registry programs, and published relative risk measures to estimate the: (1) alcohol-attributable fraction of breast cancer cases among younger women by insurance type; (2) total number of breast cancer incident cases attributable to alcohol consumption by stage at diagnosis and insurance type among younger women; and (3) total annual medical care costs of treating breast cancer incident cases attributable to alcohol consumption among younger women. Analyses were conducted in 2016; costs were expressed in 2014 U.S. dollars.

RESULTS:

Among younger women enrolled in Medicaid, private insurance, and both groups, 8.7% (95% CI=7.4%, 10.0%), 13.8% (95% CI=13.3%, 14.4%), and 12.3% (95% CI=11.4%, 13.1%) of all breast cancer cases, respectively, were attributable to alcohol consumption. Localized stage was the largest proportion of estimated attributable incident cases. The estimated total number of breast cancer incident alcohol-attributable cases was 1,636 (95% CI=1,570, 1,703) and accounted for estimated total annual medical care costs of $148.4 million (95% CI=$140.6 million, $156.1 million).

CONCLUSIONS:

Alcohol-attributable breast cancer has estimated medical care costs of nearly $150 million per year. The current findings could be used to support evidence-based interventions to reduce alcohol consumption in younger women.

PMID:
28818245
PMCID:
PMC5854476
DOI:
10.1016/j.amepre.2017.05.023
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center