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J Am Coll Cardiol. 2017 Aug 22;70(8):913-922. doi: 10.1016/j.jacc.2017.06.054.

Relationship of Alcohol Consumption to All-Cause, Cardiovascular, and Cancer-Related Mortality in U.S. Adults.

Author information

1
Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, Shandong University, Jinan, People's Republic of China. Electronic address: xibo2007@126.com.
2
Department of Preventive Medicine and Community Health, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, Texas.
3
Department of Nutrition and Food Hygiene, School of Public Health, Shandong University, Jinan, People's Republic of China.
4
Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, Shandong University, Jinan, People's Republic of China.
5
Department of Epidemiology, Capital Institute of Pediatrics, Beijing, People's Republic of China.
6
Department of Epidemiology, Capital Institute of Pediatrics, Beijing, People's Republic of China. Electronic address: jiemi@vip.163.com.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Previous studies have revealed inconsistent findings regarding the association of light to moderate alcohol consumption with cardiovascular disease (CVD) and cancer mortality.

OBJECTIVES:

The aim of this study was to examine the association between alcohol consumption and risk of mortality from all causes, cancer, and CVD in U.S. adults.

METHODS:

Data were obtained by linking 13 waves of the National Health Interview Surveys (1997 to 2009) to the National Death Index records through December 31, 2011. A total of 333,247 participants ≥18 years of age were included. Self-reported alcohol consumption patterns were categorized into 6 groups: lifetime abstainers; lifetime infrequent drinkers; former drinkers; and current light, moderate, or heavy drinkers. Secondary exposure included participants' binge-drinking status. The main outcome was all-cause, cancer, or CVD mortality.

RESULTS:

After a median follow-up of 8.2 years (2.7 million person-years), 34,754 participants died of all causes (including 8,947 CVD deaths and 8,427 cancer deaths). Compared with lifetime abstainers, those who were light or moderate alcohol consumers were at a reduced risk of mortality for all causes (light-hazard ratio [HR]: 0.79; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.76 to 0.82; moderate-HR: 0.78; 95% CI: 0.74 to 0.82) and CVD (light-HR: 0.74; 95% CI: 0.69 to 0.80; moderate-HR: 0.71; 95% CI: 0.64 to 0.78), respectively. In contrast, there was a significantly increased risk of mortality for all causes (HR: 1.11; 95% CI: 1.04 to 1.19) and cancer (HR: 1.27; 95% CI: 1.13 to 1.42) in adults with heavy alcohol consumption. Binge drinking ≥1 d/week was also associated with an increased risk of mortality for all causes (HR: 1.13; 95% CI: 1.04 to 1.23) and cancer (HR: 1.22; 95% CI: 1.05 to 1.41).

CONCLUSIONS:

Light and moderate alcohol intake might have a protective effect on all-cause and CVD-specific mortality in U.S. adults. Heavy or binge drinking was associated with increased risk of all-cause and cancer-specific mortality.

KEYWORDS:

abstain; binge drinking; cancer; cardiovascular disease; moderate drinking

PMID:
28818200
DOI:
10.1016/j.jacc.2017.06.054
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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