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Neuron. 2017 Aug 16;95(4):817-833.e4. doi: 10.1016/j.neuron.2017.07.037.

A Sensitized IGF1 Treatment Restores Corticospinal Axon-Dependent Functions.

Author information

1
F.M. Kirby Neurobiology Center, Boston Children's Hospital, 300 Longwood Avenue, Boston, MA 02115, USA; Department of Neurology, Harvard Medical School, 300 Longwood Avenue, Boston, MA 02115, USA.
2
F.M. Kirby Neurobiology Center, Boston Children's Hospital, 300 Longwood Avenue, Boston, MA 02115, USA; Department of Neurology, Harvard Medical School, 300 Longwood Avenue, Boston, MA 02115, USA; Department of Neurology, Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing University of Chinese Medicine, Nanjing 210004, China.
3
F.M. Kirby Neurobiology Center, Boston Children's Hospital, 300 Longwood Avenue, Boston, MA 02115, USA; Department of Neurology, Harvard Medical School, 300 Longwood Avenue, Boston, MA 02115, USA; Department of Neurobiology and Collaborative Innovation Center for Brain Science, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi'an 710032, China.
4
Key Laboratory of Neuroregeneration of Jiangsu and Ministry of Education, Co-innovation Center of Neuroregeneration, Nantong University, Nantong, Jiangsu 226001, China.
5
F.M. Kirby Neurobiology Center, Boston Children's Hospital, 300 Longwood Avenue, Boston, MA 02115, USA; Department of Neurology, Harvard Medical School, 300 Longwood Avenue, Boston, MA 02115, USA. Electronic address: zhigang.he@childrens.harvard.edu.

Abstract

A major hurdle for functional recovery after both spinal cord injury and cortical stroke is the limited regrowth of the axons in the corticospinal tract (CST) that originate in the motor cortex and innervate the spinal cord. Despite recent advances in engaging the intrinsic mechanisms that control CST regrowth, it remains to be tested whether such methods can promote functional recovery in translatable settings. Here we show that post-lesional AAV-assisted co-expression of two soluble proteins, namely insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1) and osteopontin (OPN), in cortical neurons leads to robust CST regrowth and the recovery of CST-dependent behavioral performance after both T10 lateral spinal hemisection and a unilateral cortical stroke. In these mice, a compound able to increase axon conduction, 4-aminopyridine-3-methanol, promotes further improvement in CST-dependent behavioral tasks. Thus, our results demonstrate a potentially translatable strategy for restoring cortical dependent function after injury in the adult.

KEYWORDS:

4-aminopyridine; IGF1; axon regeneration; axon sprouting; ischemic stroke; osteopontin; spinal cord injury

PMID:
28817801
PMCID:
PMC5582621
DOI:
10.1016/j.neuron.2017.07.037
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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