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Sci Rep. 2017 Aug 16;7(1):8460. doi: 10.1038/s41598-017-07109-8.

Differential oxidation of protein-tyrosine phosphatases during zebrafish caudal fin regeneration.

Author information

1
Biomolecular Mass Spectrometry and Proteomics, Bijvoet Center for Biomolecular Research and Utrecht Institute for Pharmaceutical Sciences, Utrecht University and Netherlands Proteomics Centre, Utrecht, The Netherlands.
2
Hubrecht Institute - KNAW and University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands.
3
Institute Biology Leiden, Leiden University, Leiden, The Netherlands.
4
Hubrecht Institute - KNAW and University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands. j.denhertog@hubrecht.eu.
5
Institute Biology Leiden, Leiden University, Leiden, The Netherlands. j.denhertog@hubrecht.eu.

Abstract

Zebrafish have the capacity to regenerate lost tissues and organs. Amputation of the caudal fin results in a rapid, transient increase in H2O2 levels emanating from the wound margin, which is essential for regeneration, because quenching of reactive oxygen species blocks regeneration. Protein-tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) have a central role in cell signalling and are susceptible to oxidation, which results in transient inactivation of their catalytic activity. We hypothesized that PTPs may become oxidized in response to amputation of the caudal fin. Using the oxidized PTP-specific (ox-PTP) antibody and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, we identified 33 PTPs in adult zebrafish fin clips of the total of 44 PTPs that can theoretically be detected based on sequence conservation. Of these 33 PTPs, 8 were significantly more oxidized 40 min after caudal fin amputation. Surprisingly, Shp2, one of the PTPs that were oxidized in response to caudal fin amputation, was required for caudal fin regeneration. In contrast, Rptpα, which was not oxidized upon amputation, was dispensable for caudal fin regeneration. Our results demonstrate that PTPs are differentially oxidized in response to caudal fin amputation and that there is a differential requirement for PTPs in regeneration.

PMID:
28814789
PMCID:
PMC5559610
DOI:
10.1038/s41598-017-07109-8
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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