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Sci Rep. 2017 Aug 15;7(1):8206. doi: 10.1038/s41598-017-08586-7.

Optimization of Storage Temperature for Retention of Undifferentiated Cell Character of Cultured Human Epidermal Cell Sheets.

Author information

1
Department of Medical Biochemistry, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway. catherinejoanjackson@gmail.com.
2
Institute of Oral Biology, Faculty of Dentistry, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway. catherinejoanjackson@gmail.com.
3
Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway. catherinejoanjackson@gmail.com.
4
Department of Medical Biochemistry, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway.
5
Department of Ophthalmology, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway.
6
Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway.
7
Institute of Clinical Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.
8
Institute of Oral Biology, Faculty of Dentistry, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.
9
Schepens Eye Research Institute, Massachusetts Eye and Ear, Department of Ophthalmology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, USA.
10
Maissonneuve-Rosemont Hospital Research Centre and Dept. of Ophthalmology, University of Montreal, Montreal, Canada.

Abstract

Cultured epidermal cell sheets (CES) containing undifferentiated cells are useful for treating skin burns and have potential for regenerative treatment of other types of epithelial injuries. The undifferentiated phenotype is therefore important for success in both applications. This study aimed to optimize a method for one-week storage of CES for their widespread distribution and use in regenerative medicine. The effect of storage temperatures 4 °C, 8 °C, 12 °C, 16 °C, and 24 °C on CES was evaluated. Analyses included assessment of viability, mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS), membrane damage, mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) integrity, morphology, phenotype and cytokine secretion into storage buffer. Lowest cell viability was seen at 4 °C. Compared to non-stored cells, ABCG2 expression increased between temperatures 8-16 °C. At 24 °C, reduced ABCG2 expression coincided with increased mitochondrial ROS, as well as increased differentiation, cell death and mtDNA damage. P63, C/EBPδ, CK10 and involucrin fluorescence combined with morphology observations supported retention of undifferentiated cell phenotype at 12 °C, transition to differentiation at 16 °C, and increased differentiation at 24 °C. Several cytokines relevant to healing were upregulated during storage. Importantly, cells stored at 12 °C showed similar viability and undifferentiated phenotype as the non-stored control suggesting that this temperature may be ideal for storage of CES.

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