Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Physiol Behav. 2017 Oct 15;180:31-38. doi: 10.1016/j.physbeh.2017.08.008. Epub 2017 Aug 12.

Can psychological well-being scales and hormone levels be used to predict acute performance of anaerobic training tasks in elite female volleyball players?

Author information

1
Elikaesport, Nutrition, Innovation & Sport, Donostia-San Sebastián, Spain. Electronic address: juankaya@msn.com.
2
Department of Exercise Science and Health Promotion, Muscle Physiology Laboratory, Florida Atlantic University, Boca Raton, FL, United States.
3
Department of Sport Science, European University of Madrid, Madrid, Spain.
4
Faculty of Physical Activity and Sport Sciences, Department of Physical Education and Sport, University of the Basque Country (UPV/EHU), Vitoria-Gasteiz, Spain.
5
Department of Health and Kinesiology, Texas A&M University - Kingsville, Kingsville, TX, United States.

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to examine relationships between pre-training psychological well-being assessment scales (General Health Questionnaire-28-GHQ-28, Competitive State Anxiety Inventory-2-CSAI-2, Sport Competition Anxiety Test-SCAT, State-Trait Anxiety Inventory-S-STAI-S, Oviedo Sleep Questionnaire-OSQ and Psychological Characteristics Related to Sport Performance-PCSP), and pre-training stress hormone concentrations (cortisol-C, total testosterone-TT, free testosterone-FT, adrenocorticotropic hormone-ACTH and testosterone/cortisol-T/C ratios), on acute neuromuscular performance (ANP) in female volleyballers. Forty elite female volleyballers (27±4yrs.; 178.3±8.5cm; 67.9±7.2kg) participated. Bivariate correlations were performed between psychological assessments and hormone levels with ANP. All psychological scales presented at least one significant (p<0.05) relationship or prediction of ANP. Contrastingly, among hormones, the only significant relationship was between TT/C ratio and Overhead Medicine Ball Throw (r=0.34; p<0.05). Therefore, our data shows that results of general and sport-specific psychological well-being scales prior to training are more consistently related to performance in elite female volleyballers than pre-training stress hormone concentrations.

KEYWORDS:

Anxiety; Hormones; Jump; Speed; Stress; Volleyball

PMID:
28811191
DOI:
10.1016/j.physbeh.2017.08.008
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center