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Drug Alcohol Depend. 2017 Oct 1;179:240-246. doi: 10.1016/j.drugalcdep.2017.07.003. Epub 2017 Aug 2.

Alcohol use and receipt of alcohol screening and brief intervention in a representative sample of sexual minority and heterosexual adults receiving health care.

Author information

1
VA Puget Sound Health Services Research and Development, Denver-Seattle Center of Innovation for Veteran-Centered Value-Driven Care, Seattle, WA, United States; Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Science, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, United States; Department of Health Services, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, United States. Electronic address: klehavot@uw.edu.
2
VA Pittsburgh Healthcare System, Center for Health Equity Research and Promotion, Pittsburgh, PA, United States.
3
Kaiser Permanente Washington Health Research Institute, Seattle, WA, United States.
4
VA Puget Sound Health Services Research and Development, Denver-Seattle Center of Innovation for Veteran-Centered Value-Driven Care, Seattle, WA, United States; Department of Health Services, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, United States.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Despite evidence of alcohol disparities between sexual minority and heterosexual individuals in the general population, research has not examined whether there are disparities in receipt of alcohol screening and brief intervention - together considered one of the highest prevention priorities for US adults. This study examined differences in alcohol use and receipt of alcohol screening and brief intervention across sexual minority status.

METHODS:

Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System 2014 data from eight US states were used to estimate patterns of alcohol use and receipt of alcohol screening and brief intervention among persons reporting sexual orientation and a checkup in the last two years (N=47,800). Analyses were conducted in 2016-2017.

RESULTS:

Gay men and bisexual women reported higher rates of alcohol use on some measures compared to heterosexual men and women, respectively. There were some differences in screening and brief intervention by sexual orientation. Lesbian women were more likely to report being asked about heavy episodic drinking than heterosexual women, and among those reporting unhealthy alcohol use, gay men were less likely, and bisexual men were more likely, to report receiving brief intervention compared to heterosexual men.

CONCLUSIONS:

Overall similarities between sexual minorities and heterosexuals in alcohol use and receipt of screening and brief intervention are encouraging. Nonetheless, research is needed to confirm findings and understand mechanisms underlying disparities in receipt of brief intervention between gay and heterosexual men.

KEYWORDS:

Alcohol screening and brief intervention; Sexual minorities; Sexual orientation

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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