Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Hypertension. 2017 Oct;70(4):729-735. doi: 10.1161/HYPERTENSIONAHA.117.09718. Epub 2017 Aug 14.

Childhood Socioeconomic Status and Arterial Stiffness in Adulthood: The Cardiovascular Risk in Young Finns Study.

Author information

1
From the Research Centre of Applied and Preventive Cardiovascular Medicine (E.P., K.P., T.T.L., C.G.M., O.T.R., M.J.), Department of Physical Activity and Health, Sports and Exercise Medicine Unit, Paavo Nurmi Centre (K.P., T.T.L.), and Department of Medicine (J.S.A.V., M.J.), University of Turku, Finland; Menzies Institute for Medical Research, University of Tasmania, Hobart, Australia (C.G.M.); Department of Pediatrics (N.H.-K.) and Department of Clinical Physiology (M.K.), Tampere University Hospital and University of Tampere, Finland; Department of Clinical Chemistry, Fimlab Laboratories and Finnish Cardiovascular Research Center-Tampere, Faculty of Medicine and Life Sciences, University of Tampere, Finland (T. Lehtimäki); Department of Pediatrics, PEDEGO Research Unit and Medical Research Center, Oulu University Hospital and University of Oulu, Finland (P.T.); Department of Pediatric Cardiology, Hospital for Children and Adolescents (E.J.), Unit of Personality, Work, and Health, Institute of Behavioural Sciences (M.E., L.P.-R.), and Helsinki Collegium for Advanced Studies, University of Helsinki, Finland (L.P.-R.); Murdoch Childrens Research Institute, Royal Children's Hospital, Australia (M.A.S.); Department of Pediatrics, University of Melbourne, Victoria, Australia (M.A.S.); Department of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine, Kuopio University Hospital and University of Eastern Finland (T. Laitinen); Division of Medicine, Turku University Hospital, Finland (J.S.A.V., M.J.); and Department of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine, University of Turku and Turku University Hospital, Finland (O.T.R.). elina.a.puolakka@utu.fi.
2
From the Research Centre of Applied and Preventive Cardiovascular Medicine (E.P., K.P., T.T.L., C.G.M., O.T.R., M.J.), Department of Physical Activity and Health, Sports and Exercise Medicine Unit, Paavo Nurmi Centre (K.P., T.T.L.), and Department of Medicine (J.S.A.V., M.J.), University of Turku, Finland; Menzies Institute for Medical Research, University of Tasmania, Hobart, Australia (C.G.M.); Department of Pediatrics (N.H.-K.) and Department of Clinical Physiology (M.K.), Tampere University Hospital and University of Tampere, Finland; Department of Clinical Chemistry, Fimlab Laboratories and Finnish Cardiovascular Research Center-Tampere, Faculty of Medicine and Life Sciences, University of Tampere, Finland (T. Lehtimäki); Department of Pediatrics, PEDEGO Research Unit and Medical Research Center, Oulu University Hospital and University of Oulu, Finland (P.T.); Department of Pediatric Cardiology, Hospital for Children and Adolescents (E.J.), Unit of Personality, Work, and Health, Institute of Behavioural Sciences (M.E., L.P.-R.), and Helsinki Collegium for Advanced Studies, University of Helsinki, Finland (L.P.-R.); Murdoch Childrens Research Institute, Royal Children's Hospital, Australia (M.A.S.); Department of Pediatrics, University of Melbourne, Victoria, Australia (M.A.S.); Department of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine, Kuopio University Hospital and University of Eastern Finland (T. Laitinen); Division of Medicine, Turku University Hospital, Finland (J.S.A.V., M.J.); and Department of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine, University of Turku and Turku University Hospital, Finland (O.T.R.).

Abstract

Increasing evidence supports the importance of socioeconomic factors in the development of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. However, the association of childhood socioeconomic status (SES) with arterial stiffness in adulthood has not been reported. Our aim was to determine whether higher childhood family-level SES is associated with lower arterial stiffness in adulthood. The analyses were performed using data gathered within the longitudinal Young Finns Study. The sample comprised 2566 participants who had data concerning family SES at ages 3 to 18 years in 1980 and arterial pulse wave velocity and carotid artery distensibility measured 21 or 27 years later in adulthood. Higher family SES in childhood was associated with lower arterial stiffness in adulthood; carotid artery distensibility being higher (β value±SE, 0.029±0.0089%/10 mm Hg; P=0.001) and pulse wave velocity lower (β value±SE, -0.062±0.022 m/s; P=0.006) among those with higher family SES in a multivariable analysis adjusted with age, sex, and conventional childhood cardiometabolic risk factors. The association remained significant after further adjustment for participant's SES in adulthood (β value±SE, 0.026±0.010%/10 mm Hg; P=0.01 for carotid artery distensibility and β value±SE, -0.048±0.023 m/s; P=0.04 for pulse wave velocity) but attenuated after adjustment for adulthood cardiometabolic risk factors (β value±SE, 0.015±0.008%/10 mm Hg; P=0.08 for carotid artery distensibility and β value±SE, -0.019±0.02 m/s; P=0.38 for pulse wave velocity). In conclusion, we observed an association between higher family SES in childhood and lower arterial stiffness in adulthood. Our findings suggest that special attention could be paid to children from low SES families to prevent cardiometabolic diseases primordially.

KEYWORDS:

attention; cardiovascular diseases; risk factors; social class; vascular stiffness

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Atypon
Loading ...
Support Center