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J Infect. 2017 Nov;75(5):441-447. doi: 10.1016/j.jinf.2017.08.003. Epub 2017 Aug 10.

The potential of a portable, point-of-care electronic nose to diagnose tuberculosis.

Author information

1
Instituto Nacional de Enfermedades Respiratorias y del Ambiente (INERAM), Asunción, Paraguay.
2
Instituto Nacional de Enfermedades Respiratorias y del Ambiente (INERAM), Asunción, Paraguay; Laboratorio Central de Salud Pública (LCSP), Asunción, Paraguay.
3
The eNose Company, Zutphen, The Netherlands.
4
Radboud University Medical Centre - Dekkerswald, Nijmegen, Groesbeek, The Netherlands.
5
Radboud University, Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behavior, Radboud University Nijmegen, Nijmegen, The Netherlands; Big4Data, Nijmegen, The Netherlands.
6
Radboud University Medical Centre - Dekkerswald, Nijmegen, Groesbeek, The Netherlands. Electronic address: cecile.magis-escurra@RadboudUMC.nl.

Abstract

INTRODUCTION:

Tuberculosis (TB) is the leading cause of death due to an infectious disease worldwide. Especially in low-income countries, new diagnostic techniques that are accessible, inexpensive and easy-to-use, are needed to shorten transmission time and initiate treatment earlier.

OBJECTIVE:

We conducted a study with a handheld, point-of-care electronic nose (eNose) device to diagnose TB through exhaled breath.

SETTING:

This study includes a total of 110 patients and visitors of an expert centre of respiratory diseases in Asunción, Paraguay. TB diagnosis was established by culture of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex and compared with the eNose results in two phases.

RESULTS:

The calibration phase, including only culture confirmed TB cases versus healthy people, demonstrated a sensitivity and specificity of 91% and 93% respectively. The confirmation phase, including all participants, showed a sensitivity of 88% and a specificity of 92%. The eNose showed high acceptance rate among participants, and was easy to operate.

CONCLUSION:

The eNose resulted in a powerful technique to differentiate between healthy people and TB patients. Its comfort, speed and usability promise great potential in vulnerable groups, in remote areas and hospital settings to triage patients with suspicion of TB.

KEYWORDS:

Breath smell prints; Exhaled breath; Tuberculosis; Volatile organic compounds (VOC's)

PMID:
28804027
DOI:
10.1016/j.jinf.2017.08.003
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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