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Biol Trace Elem Res. 2018 May;183(1):114-122. doi: 10.1007/s12011-017-1115-y. Epub 2017 Aug 12.

Iodine-Rich Herbs and Potassium Iodate Have Different Effects on the Oxidative Stress and Differentiation of TH17 Cells in Iodine-Deficient NOD.H-2h4 Mice.

Author information

1
The First Clinical College, Liaoning University of Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM), Chongshan East Road No.72, Shenyang, Liaoning, 110032, China.
2
The First Clinical College, Liaoning University of Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM), Chongshan East Road No.72, Shenyang, Liaoning, 110032, China. gaotianshu67@163.com.
3
Department of Endocrine, Affiliated Hospital, Liaoning University of TCM, Beiling Street No.33, Shenyang, Liaoning, 110032, China. gaotianshu67@163.com.

Abstract

Iodine-rich herbs such as seaweed, kelp, and sea tangle were widely used to treat various types of goiter with good effect and without any adverse side effects in China. When compared with potassium iodate (PI), iodine-rich herbs had a positive effect on the recovery of goiter resulting from iodine deficiency without any obvious harmful effects. In NOD.H-2h4 mice, an autoimmune thyroiditis-prone model, iodine excess can increase infiltration of lymphocytes and structural damage of the thyroid follicles, hence resulting in thyroiditis. Until now, there has been little research on the comparative effects of PI and iodine-rich herbs on thyroid in an autoimmune thyroiditis-prone model. This study was designed to compare the different effects of iodine-rich herbs and PI on the thyroid gland in iodine-deficient NOD.H-2h4 mice. Excessive intake of PI cause oxidative injury in the thyroid gland and increase the risk of autoimmune thyroiditis, while iodine-rich herbs cause less oxidative injury, significantly enhancing antioxidant capacity, and inhibit the high differentiation of Th17 cells in the thyroid glands of NOD.H-2h4 mice.

KEYWORDS:

Autoimmune thyroiditis; Herbs with iodine excess; Oxidative stress; Potassium iodate; Th17 cell

PMID:
28803408
DOI:
10.1007/s12011-017-1115-y
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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