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Psychiatry Res. 2017 Nov;257:372-374. doi: 10.1016/j.psychres.2017.07.070. Epub 2017 Aug 1.

Acute effects of smoked marijuana in marijuana smokers at clinical high-risk for psychosis: A preliminary study.

Author information

1
Departments of Psychiatry and Molecular Medicine, Hofstra Northwell School of Medicine and the Center for Psychiatric Neuroscience, Feinstein Institute for Medical Research, 1010 Northern Blvd, Suite #311, Great Neck, NY 11021, USA. Electronic address: nvadhan@northwell.edu.
2
Department of Psychiatry, Columbia University Medical Center and the New York State Psychiatric Institute, New York, NY, USA.

Abstract

Marijuana use is associated with psychosis, but its effects are understudied in individuals with preexisting risk for psychotic disorders. This preliminary study examined the acute psychological and physiological effects of smoked marijuana (0.0% or 5.5% Δ9-THC) in marijuana users at clinical high-risk (CHR; n = 6) to develop a psychotic disorder, and those not at risk (n = 6), under controlled laboratory conditions. CHR marijuana users exhibited temporary increases in psychotic-like states and decreases in neurocognitive performance during marijuana intoxication but control marijuana smokers did not. These findings, if replicated, may support a psychotogenic role for marijuana in CHR individuals.

KEYWORDS:

Cannabis; Prodromal psychosis; Ultra high-risk

PMID:
28803095
PMCID:
PMC5890804
DOI:
10.1016/j.psychres.2017.07.070
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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