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J Dairy Sci. 2017 Oct;100(10):7780-7787. doi: 10.3168/jds.2017-12961. Epub 2017 Aug 10.

Effect of fermented milk containing Lactobacillus rhamnosus SD11 on oral microbiota of healthy volunteers: A randomized clinical trial.

Author information

1
Common Oral Diseases and Epidemiology Research Center, Prince of Songkla University, Hat-Yai, 90112, Thailand; Department of Conservative Dentistry, Prince of Songkla University, Hat-Yai, 90112, Thailand.
2
Common Oral Diseases and Epidemiology Research Center, Prince of Songkla University, Hat-Yai, 90112, Thailand; Department of Preventive Dentistry, Prince of Songkla University, Hat-Yai, 90112, Thailand.
3
Common Oral Diseases and Epidemiology Research Center, Prince of Songkla University, Hat-Yai, 90112, Thailand; Department of Stomatology, Faculty of Dentistry, Prince of Songkla University, Hat-Yai, 90112, Thailand. Electronic address: rawee.t@psu.ac.th.

Abstract

The aims of this study were to evaluate whether short-term consumption of fermented milk containing Lactobacillus rhamnosus SD11 affected levels of oral microbiota in vivo and whether L. rhamnosus SD11 could colonize in the human mouth. We also monitored for potential side effects of the probiotic. The applicability of using L. rhamnosus SD11 compared with Lactobacillus bulgaricus as a starter culture for fermented milk was evaluated. After informed consent, 43 healthy young adults were recruited and randomly assigned to either the probiotic or control group and received fermented milk containing L. rhamnosus SD11 or L. bulgaricus, respectively, once daily for 4 wk. The numbers of mutans streptococci, lactobacilli, and total bacteria in saliva were counted at baseline and then after 4 and 8 wk. An oral examination was performed at baseline and after 8 wk. The persistence of L. rhamnosus SD11 was investigated by DNA fingerprinting using arbitrary primer-PCR. Results demonstrated that statistically significant reductions in mutans streptococci and total bacteria were observed in the probiotic group compared with the control group, and the number of lactobacilli was significantly increased in both groups after receiving fermented milks. Lactobacillus rhamnosus SD11 could be detected (in >80% of subjects) up to 4 wk following cessation of dosing among subjects in the probiotic group. No side effects were reported. Thus, L. rhamnosus SD11 could be used as a starter culture for fermented milk. Daily consumption of L. rhamnosus SD11-containing fermented milk for 4 wk may have beneficial effects on oral health by reducing salivary levels of mutans streptococci. The probiotic was apparently able to colonize the oral cavity for a longer time than previously reported. However, the potential benefits of probiotic L. rhamnosus SD11 on oral health require further evaluation with a larger group of volunteers in a longer-term study.

KEYWORDS:

lactobacilli; mutans streptococci; oral health; probiotics

PMID:
28803012
DOI:
10.3168/jds.2017-12961
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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