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Body Image. 2017 Sep;22:148-155. doi: 10.1016/j.bodyim.2017.07.003. Epub 2017 Aug 9.

Body image in emerging adults: The protective role of self-compassion.

Author information

1
APPEAR, Department of Applied Psychology, Northeastern University, Boston, MA 02115, United States. Electronic address: r.rodgers@northeastern.edu.
2
APPEAR, Department of Applied Psychology, Northeastern University, Boston, MA 02115, United States.
3
BodiMojo Inc., 1631 Canton Ave, Milton, MA 02168, United States; Department of Psychology, Simmons College, Boston, MA 02115, United States.
4
BodiMojo Inc., 1631 Canton Ave, Milton, MA 02168, United States.

Abstract

Self-compassion is thought to protect from body image concerns. However, the mechanisms of this effect remain unclear. This study examined three positive dimensions of self-compassion as moderators of the mediated relationship between perceived overweight status, appearance comparison, and appearance esteem. A sample of 232 youth aged 13-18 years, mean=18.36 (SD=1.5) years, reported on appearance esteem, appearance comparison, perceived weight status, and self-compassion dimensions including self-kindness, common humanity, and mindfulness. Among boys, mindfulness and common humanity moderated the perceived weight status to appearance comparison pathway of the mediation (ps=.01), such that this relationship was weaker among boys with higher levels of these dimensions of self-compassion. These findings were not replicated among girls. None of the self-compassion dimensions moderated the appearance comparison to appearance esteem pathway. Self-compassion dimensions that decrease the focus on the self may protect against body image concerns among boys.

KEYWORDS:

Appearance comparison; Body image; Emerging adults; Perceived weight status; Self-compassion

PMID:
28802198
PMCID:
PMC5704907
DOI:
10.1016/j.bodyim.2017.07.003
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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